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HIV disease as a risk factor for periodontal disease.
Compendium. 1994 Aug; 15(8):1052, 1054-63; quiz 1064.C

Abstract

A multitude of oral lesions, including unique forms of periodontal disease, have been discovered in individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although the frequency of HIV-associated periodontal diseases appears to be less than previously thought, many researchers agree that an important factor influencing the prevalence of unique periodontal disease in the HIV population is the degree of immunodeficiency. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated periodontal diseases remains unclear, but may be the result of microbiota and/or alterations in the host. HIV-gingivitis, now called linear gingival erythema, and HIV-periodontitis, now called necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis, have microbiology profiles similar to conventional adult periodontitis, although these lesions are quite different clinically. This article reviews clinical signs and symptoms, treatments, and the pathogenesis of HIV-related periodontal findings. It specifically focuses on the immuno-incompetence of HIV disease as a risk factor for periodontal disease. Because the caseload of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients will increase significantly in the future, the dental practitioner must be able to recognize and manage the periodontal lesions associated with HIV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dept. of Periodontics, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Dental School, Newark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7987897

Citation

Murray, P A.. "HIV Disease as a Risk Factor for Periodontal Disease." Compendium (Newtown, Pa.), vol. 15, no. 8, 1994, pp. 1052, 1054-63; quiz 1064.
Murray PA. HIV disease as a risk factor for periodontal disease. Compendium. 1994;15(8):1052, 1054-63; quiz 1064.
Murray, P. A. (1994). HIV disease as a risk factor for periodontal disease. Compendium (Newtown, Pa.), 15(8), 1052, 1054-63; quiz 1064.
Murray PA. HIV Disease as a Risk Factor for Periodontal Disease. Compendium. 1994;15(8):1052, 1054-63; quiz 1064. PubMed PMID: 7987897.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HIV disease as a risk factor for periodontal disease. A1 - Murray,P A, PY - 1994/8/1/pubmed PY - 1994/8/1/medline PY - 1994/8/1/entrez SP - 1052, 1054-63; quiz 1064 JF - Compendium (Newtown, Pa.) JO - Compendium VL - 15 IS - 8 N2 - A multitude of oral lesions, including unique forms of periodontal disease, have been discovered in individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although the frequency of HIV-associated periodontal diseases appears to be less than previously thought, many researchers agree that an important factor influencing the prevalence of unique periodontal disease in the HIV population is the degree of immunodeficiency. The pathogenesis of HIV-associated periodontal diseases remains unclear, but may be the result of microbiota and/or alterations in the host. HIV-gingivitis, now called linear gingival erythema, and HIV-periodontitis, now called necrotizing ulcerative periodontitis, have microbiology profiles similar to conventional adult periodontitis, although these lesions are quite different clinically. This article reviews clinical signs and symptoms, treatments, and the pathogenesis of HIV-related periodontal findings. It specifically focuses on the immuno-incompetence of HIV disease as a risk factor for periodontal disease. Because the caseload of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients will increase significantly in the future, the dental practitioner must be able to recognize and manage the periodontal lesions associated with HIV infection. SN - 0894-1009 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7987897/HIV_disease_as_a_risk_factor_for_periodontal_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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