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The right gastroepiploic artery graft. Clinical and angiographic midterm results in 200 patients.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1993 Apr; 105(4):615-22; discussion 623.JT

Abstract

From March 1986 to September 1991, the right gastroepiploic artery has been used for coronary artery bypass grafting in 200 patients (171 male and 29 female patients, mean age 58 years, range 6 to 80 years. They were followed up from 6 to 70 months with a mean of 27 months. There were 16 reoperations and 176 patients had triple vessel or left main disease. The gastroepiploic artery (182 in situ and 18 free grafts) was anastomosed to 11 anterior descending, 3 diagonal, 26 circumflex, and 160 right coronary arteries. The internal thoracic artery was concomitantly used in 192 patients. The mean number of distal anastomoses was 2.3 with arterial grafts and 3.3 including additional saphenous vein grafts. Postoperative angiography was performed in 152 patients within 6 months after the operation (mean 2 months) and after the operation second angiograms were done sequentially 1 to 5 years (mean 2 years) after the operation in 40 patients. There were 6 early and 4 late deaths. A new Q wave was noted in 4 patients. Duration of the operation and postoperative complications did not increase with the use of the gastroepiploic artery. Relief of angina was noted in 186 patients. Gastroepiploic artery graft patency was 95% (144/152) in the early postoperative period and 95% (38/40) in the late postoperative period. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was done successfully through the in situ gastroepiploic artery graft for anastomotic stenosis in four cases. In stress myocardial scintiscans, performed sequentially preoperatively and in the immediate, 1-year, and 2-year postoperative periods in 11 patients, washout rate of the gastroepiploic artery-grafted area improved from 35% +/- 10% to 45% +/- 15% (p < 0.05) and was maintained to 43% +/- 6% and 48% +/- 9% at respective periods. In conclusion, the gastroepiploic artery is a suitable conduit for coronary artery bypass grafting in terms of low surgical risk, high patency rate, and excellent patient outcome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

7993384

Citation

Suma, H, et al. "The Right Gastroepiploic Artery Graft. Clinical and Angiographic Midterm Results in 200 Patients." The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, vol. 105, no. 4, 1993, pp. 615-22; discussion 623.
Suma H, Wanibuchi Y, Terada Y, et al. The right gastroepiploic artery graft. Clinical and angiographic midterm results in 200 patients. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1993;105(4):615-22; discussion 623.
Suma, H., Wanibuchi, Y., Terada, Y., Fukuda, S., Takayama, T., & Furuta, S. (1993). The right gastroepiploic artery graft. Clinical and angiographic midterm results in 200 patients. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 105(4), 615-22; discussion 623.
Suma H, et al. The Right Gastroepiploic Artery Graft. Clinical and Angiographic Midterm Results in 200 Patients. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1993;105(4):615-22; discussion 623. PubMed PMID: 7993384.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The right gastroepiploic artery graft. Clinical and angiographic midterm results in 200 patients. AU - Suma,H, AU - Wanibuchi,Y, AU - Terada,Y, AU - Fukuda,S, AU - Takayama,T, AU - Furuta,S, PY - 1993/4/1/pubmed PY - 1993/4/1/medline PY - 1993/4/1/entrez SP - 615-22; discussion 623 JF - The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery JO - J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg VL - 105 IS - 4 N2 - From March 1986 to September 1991, the right gastroepiploic artery has been used for coronary artery bypass grafting in 200 patients (171 male and 29 female patients, mean age 58 years, range 6 to 80 years. They were followed up from 6 to 70 months with a mean of 27 months. There were 16 reoperations and 176 patients had triple vessel or left main disease. The gastroepiploic artery (182 in situ and 18 free grafts) was anastomosed to 11 anterior descending, 3 diagonal, 26 circumflex, and 160 right coronary arteries. The internal thoracic artery was concomitantly used in 192 patients. The mean number of distal anastomoses was 2.3 with arterial grafts and 3.3 including additional saphenous vein grafts. Postoperative angiography was performed in 152 patients within 6 months after the operation (mean 2 months) and after the operation second angiograms were done sequentially 1 to 5 years (mean 2 years) after the operation in 40 patients. There were 6 early and 4 late deaths. A new Q wave was noted in 4 patients. Duration of the operation and postoperative complications did not increase with the use of the gastroepiploic artery. Relief of angina was noted in 186 patients. Gastroepiploic artery graft patency was 95% (144/152) in the early postoperative period and 95% (38/40) in the late postoperative period. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was done successfully through the in situ gastroepiploic artery graft for anastomotic stenosis in four cases. In stress myocardial scintiscans, performed sequentially preoperatively and in the immediate, 1-year, and 2-year postoperative periods in 11 patients, washout rate of the gastroepiploic artery-grafted area improved from 35% +/- 10% to 45% +/- 15% (p < 0.05) and was maintained to 43% +/- 6% and 48% +/- 9% at respective periods. In conclusion, the gastroepiploic artery is a suitable conduit for coronary artery bypass grafting in terms of low surgical risk, high patency rate, and excellent patient outcome. SN - 0022-5223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/7993384/The_right_gastroepiploic_artery_graft__Clinical_and_angiographic_midterm_results_in_200_patients_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/coronaryarterybypasssurgery.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -