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Anatomical substrates of auditory selective attention: behavioral and electrophysiological effects of posterior association cortex lesions.
Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 1993 Dec; 1(4):227-40.BR

Abstract

Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and reaction times (RTs) were recorded in an auditory selective attention task in control subjects and two groups of patients with lesions centered in (1) the temporal/parietal junction (T/P, n = 9); and (2) the inferior parietal lobe (IPL, n = 7). High pitched tones were presented to one ear and low pitched tones to the other in random sequences that included infrequent longer-duration tones and occasional novel sounds. Subjects attended to a specified ear and pressed a button to the longer-duration tones in that ear. IPL and T/P lesions slowed reaction times (RTs) and increased error rates, but improved one aspect of performance--patients showed less distraction than controls when targets followed novel sounds. T/P lesions reduced the amplitude of early sensory ERPs, initially over the damaged hemisphere (N1a, 70-110 ms) and then bilaterally (N1b, 110-130 ms, and N1c 130-160 ms). The reduction was accentuated for tones presented contralateral to the lesion, suggesting that N1 generators receive excitatory input primarily from the contralateral ear. IPL lesions reduced N1 amplitudes to both low frequency tones and novel sounds. Nd components associated with attentional selection were diminished over both hemispheres in the T/P group and over the lesioned hemisphere in the IPL group independent of ear of stimulation. Target and novel N2s tended to be diminished by IPL lesions but were unaffected by T/P lesions. The mismatch negativity was unaffected by either T/P or IPL lesions. The results support different roles of T/P and IPL cortex in auditory selective attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, UC Davis, VA Medical Center, Martinez, CA 94553.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8003922

Citation

Woods, D L., et al. "Anatomical Substrates of Auditory Selective Attention: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Effects of Posterior Association Cortex Lesions." Brain Research. Cognitive Brain Research, vol. 1, no. 4, 1993, pp. 227-40.
Woods DL, Knight RT, Scabini D. Anatomical substrates of auditory selective attention: behavioral and electrophysiological effects of posterior association cortex lesions. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 1993;1(4):227-40.
Woods, D. L., Knight, R. T., & Scabini, D. (1993). Anatomical substrates of auditory selective attention: behavioral and electrophysiological effects of posterior association cortex lesions. Brain Research. Cognitive Brain Research, 1(4), 227-40.
Woods DL, Knight RT, Scabini D. Anatomical Substrates of Auditory Selective Attention: Behavioral and Electrophysiological Effects of Posterior Association Cortex Lesions. Brain Res Cogn Brain Res. 1993;1(4):227-40. PubMed PMID: 8003922.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anatomical substrates of auditory selective attention: behavioral and electrophysiological effects of posterior association cortex lesions. AU - Woods,D L, AU - Knight,R T, AU - Scabini,D, PY - 1993/12/1/pubmed PY - 1993/12/1/medline PY - 1993/12/1/entrez SP - 227 EP - 40 JF - Brain research. Cognitive brain research JO - Brain Res Cogn Brain Res VL - 1 IS - 4 N2 - Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and reaction times (RTs) were recorded in an auditory selective attention task in control subjects and two groups of patients with lesions centered in (1) the temporal/parietal junction (T/P, n = 9); and (2) the inferior parietal lobe (IPL, n = 7). High pitched tones were presented to one ear and low pitched tones to the other in random sequences that included infrequent longer-duration tones and occasional novel sounds. Subjects attended to a specified ear and pressed a button to the longer-duration tones in that ear. IPL and T/P lesions slowed reaction times (RTs) and increased error rates, but improved one aspect of performance--patients showed less distraction than controls when targets followed novel sounds. T/P lesions reduced the amplitude of early sensory ERPs, initially over the damaged hemisphere (N1a, 70-110 ms) and then bilaterally (N1b, 110-130 ms, and N1c 130-160 ms). The reduction was accentuated for tones presented contralateral to the lesion, suggesting that N1 generators receive excitatory input primarily from the contralateral ear. IPL lesions reduced N1 amplitudes to both low frequency tones and novel sounds. Nd components associated with attentional selection were diminished over both hemispheres in the T/P group and over the lesioned hemisphere in the IPL group independent of ear of stimulation. Target and novel N2s tended to be diminished by IPL lesions but were unaffected by T/P lesions. The mismatch negativity was unaffected by either T/P or IPL lesions. The results support different roles of T/P and IPL cortex in auditory selective attention. SN - 0926-6410 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8003922/Anatomical_substrates_of_auditory_selective_attention:_behavioral_and_electrophysiological_effects_of_posterior_association_cortex_lesions_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -