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Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches.
J Exp Med. 1994 Jul 01; 180(1):15-23.JE

Abstract

Salmonella species are known to initiate infection of mammalian hosts by penetrating the intestinal epithelium of the small bowel. These bacteria preferentially interact with Peyer's patches which are collections of lymphoid follicles making up the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. We infected murine ligated intestinal loops with invasive and noninvasive Salmonella typhimurium strains for 30, 60, 120, and 180 min and examined the infected tissue by transmission electron microscopy. Within 30 min, we found that invasive S. typhimurium exclusively entered M cells found within the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of the Peyer's patches. Initially, interactions between invasive bacteria and enterocytes adjacent to the M cells were not found. Invasion of M cells was associated with the ability of the bacteria to invade tissue culture cells. S. typhimurium mutants, which were noninvasive for tissue culture cells, could not be found in ligated loops associated with M cells or enterocytes after incubations of 30, 60, 120, or 180 min. At 60 min, internalized invasive S. typhimurium were cytotoxic for the M cells. Destruction of an M cell formed a gap in the FAE which allowed organisms to invade enterocytes adjacent to the dead cell. Later in the infection process (120 and 180 min), the presence of bacteria beneath the FAE correlated with changes in the cytoarchitecture of the lymphoid follicle. In addition, replicating Salmonella began to enter both the apical and basolateral surfaces of enterocytes adjacent to infected M cells.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, California 54302-5402.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8006579

Citation

Jones, B D., et al. "Salmonella Typhimurium Initiates Murine Infection By Penetrating and Destroying the Specialized Epithelial M Cells of the Peyer's Patches." The Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 180, no. 1, 1994, pp. 15-23.
Jones BD, Ghori N, Falkow S. Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches. J Exp Med. 1994;180(1):15-23.
Jones, B. D., Ghori, N., & Falkow, S. (1994). Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches. The Journal of Experimental Medicine, 180(1), 15-23.
Jones BD, Ghori N, Falkow S. Salmonella Typhimurium Initiates Murine Infection By Penetrating and Destroying the Specialized Epithelial M Cells of the Peyer's Patches. J Exp Med. 1994 Jul 1;180(1):15-23. PubMed PMID: 8006579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Salmonella typhimurium initiates murine infection by penetrating and destroying the specialized epithelial M cells of the Peyer's patches. AU - Jones,B D, AU - Ghori,N, AU - Falkow,S, PY - 1994/7/1/pubmed PY - 1994/7/1/medline PY - 1994/7/1/entrez SP - 15 EP - 23 JF - The Journal of experimental medicine JO - J Exp Med VL - 180 IS - 1 N2 - Salmonella species are known to initiate infection of mammalian hosts by penetrating the intestinal epithelium of the small bowel. These bacteria preferentially interact with Peyer's patches which are collections of lymphoid follicles making up the gut-associated lymphoid tissue. We infected murine ligated intestinal loops with invasive and noninvasive Salmonella typhimurium strains for 30, 60, 120, and 180 min and examined the infected tissue by transmission electron microscopy. Within 30 min, we found that invasive S. typhimurium exclusively entered M cells found within the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) of the Peyer's patches. Initially, interactions between invasive bacteria and enterocytes adjacent to the M cells were not found. Invasion of M cells was associated with the ability of the bacteria to invade tissue culture cells. S. typhimurium mutants, which were noninvasive for tissue culture cells, could not be found in ligated loops associated with M cells or enterocytes after incubations of 30, 60, 120, or 180 min. At 60 min, internalized invasive S. typhimurium were cytotoxic for the M cells. Destruction of an M cell formed a gap in the FAE which allowed organisms to invade enterocytes adjacent to the dead cell. Later in the infection process (120 and 180 min), the presence of bacteria beneath the FAE correlated with changes in the cytoarchitecture of the lymphoid follicle. In addition, replicating Salmonella began to enter both the apical and basolateral surfaces of enterocytes adjacent to infected M cells. SN - 0022-1007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8006579/Salmonella_typhimurium_initiates_murine_infection_by_penetrating_and_destroying_the_specialized_epithelial_M_cells_of_the_Peyer's_patches_ L2 - https://rupress.org/jem/article-lookup/doi/10.1084/jem.180.1.15 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -