Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of nutritional supplementation on bone mineral status of children with rheumatic diseases receiving corticosteroid therapy.
J Rheumatol 1994; 21(3):530-5JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Because children with rheumatic disease receiving longterm corticosteroids are at high risk for developing osteoporosis, we attempted to determine whether nutritional supplementation would improve bone status in this group of children.

METHODS

In a crossover design study, 10 corticosteroid treated children with rheumatic disease and osteoporosis received calcium and vitamin D supplementation for 6 months to determine their effect on bone density. They were then studied for 6 months without added nutrition supplements. The mean age was 13.1 years with a mean duration of disease of 4.2 years. Six patients had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, 2 had systemic lupus erythematosus and 2 had mixed connective tissue disease. These children obtained a minimum of 1 g of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D daily from diet and added supplements. Dual photon absorptiometry, laboratory and dietary data were obtained at baseline, 6 months, and one year.

RESULTS

Spinal bone density significantly improved with supplementation. Osteocalcin values remained low throughout the study.

CONCLUSION

Our results suggest some children with rheumatic disease receiving corticosteroids would benefit from calcium and vitamin D supplementation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Childrens Rehabilitation Unit, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City 66160-7330.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8006898

Citation

Warady, B D., et al. "Effects of Nutritional Supplementation On Bone Mineral Status of Children With Rheumatic Diseases Receiving Corticosteroid Therapy." The Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 21, no. 3, 1994, pp. 530-5.
Warady BD, Lindsley CB, Robinson FG, et al. Effects of nutritional supplementation on bone mineral status of children with rheumatic diseases receiving corticosteroid therapy. J Rheumatol. 1994;21(3):530-5.
Warady, B. D., Lindsley, C. B., Robinson, F. G., & Lukert, B. P. (1994). Effects of nutritional supplementation on bone mineral status of children with rheumatic diseases receiving corticosteroid therapy. The Journal of Rheumatology, 21(3), pp. 530-5.
Warady BD, et al. Effects of Nutritional Supplementation On Bone Mineral Status of Children With Rheumatic Diseases Receiving Corticosteroid Therapy. J Rheumatol. 1994;21(3):530-5. PubMed PMID: 8006898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of nutritional supplementation on bone mineral status of children with rheumatic diseases receiving corticosteroid therapy. AU - Warady,B D, AU - Lindsley,C B, AU - Robinson,F G, AU - Lukert,B P, PY - 1994/3/1/pubmed PY - 1994/3/1/medline PY - 1994/3/1/entrez SP - 530 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of rheumatology JO - J. Rheumatol. VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Because children with rheumatic disease receiving longterm corticosteroids are at high risk for developing osteoporosis, we attempted to determine whether nutritional supplementation would improve bone status in this group of children. METHODS: In a crossover design study, 10 corticosteroid treated children with rheumatic disease and osteoporosis received calcium and vitamin D supplementation for 6 months to determine their effect on bone density. They were then studied for 6 months without added nutrition supplements. The mean age was 13.1 years with a mean duration of disease of 4.2 years. Six patients had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, 2 had systemic lupus erythematosus and 2 had mixed connective tissue disease. These children obtained a minimum of 1 g of calcium and 400 IU of vitamin D daily from diet and added supplements. Dual photon absorptiometry, laboratory and dietary data were obtained at baseline, 6 months, and one year. RESULTS: Spinal bone density significantly improved with supplementation. Osteocalcin values remained low throughout the study. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest some children with rheumatic disease receiving corticosteroids would benefit from calcium and vitamin D supplementation. SN - 0315-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8006898/full_citation L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bonedensity.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -