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Survival in hepatitis-B cirrhosis compared to alcoholic cirrhosis in patients with Child's C liver disease: a prospective study of endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding oesophageal varices.
Singapore Med J. 1994 Feb; 35(1):53-6.SM

Abstract

A prospective comparative study was carried out on thirty-seven consecutive patients presenting with bleeding oesophageal varices at University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. All patients received injection sclerotherapy if active bleeding was seen at the time of initial endoscopy, followed by repetitive courses of sclerotherapy to obliterate the varices. Predominant aetiological factors were hepatitis-B cirrhosis (43%) and alcoholic cirrhosis (30%). Chinese ethnic group accounted for 62.5% of hepatitis-B cirrhotics and Indian 73% of alcoholic cirrhotics. After excluding patients lost to follow-up, analysis of the remaining thirty-four patients showed reduced long-term survival in patients with Child's C disease. Log-rank analysis of survival curves between hepatitis-B cirrhosis and alcoholic cirrhosis in patients with Child's C liver disease showed no significant difference in long-term survival (p = 0.07). However, six deaths were seen in hepatitis-B cirrhosis compared to one death in alcoholic cirrhosis in the first eight months of follow-up. Most patients died from progressive liver failure. Median survival for Child's C hepatitis-B cirrhosis was 7.5 months whereas this had not been reached for Child's C alcoholic cirrhosis (median follow-up 11.6 months). We conclude that variceal haemorrhage in Child's C hepatitis-B cirrhosis is a bad prognostic sign and is associated with reduced survival with a median survival of 7.5 months despite control of the variceal bleed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8009280

Citation

Lee, S M., and N W. Wong. "Survival in hepatitis-B Cirrhosis Compared to Alcoholic Cirrhosis in Patients With Child's C Liver Disease: a Prospective Study of Endoscopic Sclerotherapy for Bleeding Oesophageal Varices." Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 35, no. 1, 1994, pp. 53-6.
Lee SM, Wong NW. Survival in hepatitis-B cirrhosis compared to alcoholic cirrhosis in patients with Child's C liver disease: a prospective study of endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding oesophageal varices. Singapore Med J. 1994;35(1):53-6.
Lee, S. M., & Wong, N. W. (1994). Survival in hepatitis-B cirrhosis compared to alcoholic cirrhosis in patients with Child's C liver disease: a prospective study of endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding oesophageal varices. Singapore Medical Journal, 35(1), 53-6.
Lee SM, Wong NW. Survival in hepatitis-B Cirrhosis Compared to Alcoholic Cirrhosis in Patients With Child's C Liver Disease: a Prospective Study of Endoscopic Sclerotherapy for Bleeding Oesophageal Varices. Singapore Med J. 1994;35(1):53-6. PubMed PMID: 8009280.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Survival in hepatitis-B cirrhosis compared to alcoholic cirrhosis in patients with Child's C liver disease: a prospective study of endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding oesophageal varices. AU - Lee,S M, AU - Wong,N W, PY - 1994/2/1/pubmed PY - 1994/2/1/medline PY - 1994/2/1/entrez SP - 53 EP - 6 JF - Singapore medical journal JO - Singapore Med J VL - 35 IS - 1 N2 - A prospective comparative study was carried out on thirty-seven consecutive patients presenting with bleeding oesophageal varices at University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. All patients received injection sclerotherapy if active bleeding was seen at the time of initial endoscopy, followed by repetitive courses of sclerotherapy to obliterate the varices. Predominant aetiological factors were hepatitis-B cirrhosis (43%) and alcoholic cirrhosis (30%). Chinese ethnic group accounted for 62.5% of hepatitis-B cirrhotics and Indian 73% of alcoholic cirrhotics. After excluding patients lost to follow-up, analysis of the remaining thirty-four patients showed reduced long-term survival in patients with Child's C disease. Log-rank analysis of survival curves between hepatitis-B cirrhosis and alcoholic cirrhosis in patients with Child's C liver disease showed no significant difference in long-term survival (p = 0.07). However, six deaths were seen in hepatitis-B cirrhosis compared to one death in alcoholic cirrhosis in the first eight months of follow-up. Most patients died from progressive liver failure. Median survival for Child's C hepatitis-B cirrhosis was 7.5 months whereas this had not been reached for Child's C alcoholic cirrhosis (median follow-up 11.6 months). We conclude that variceal haemorrhage in Child's C hepatitis-B cirrhosis is a bad prognostic sign and is associated with reduced survival with a median survival of 7.5 months despite control of the variceal bleed. SN - 0037-5675 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8009280/Survival_in_hepatitis_B_cirrhosis_compared_to_alcoholic_cirrhosis_in_patients_with_Child's_C_liver_disease:_a_prospective_study_of_endoscopic_sclerotherapy_for_bleeding_oesophageal_varices_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/4280 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -