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Sedation of difficult-to-sedate children undergoing MR imaging: value of thioridazine as an adjunct to chloral hydrate.
AJR Am J Roentgenol 1994; 163(1):165-8AA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of thioridazine as an adjunct to chloral hydrate sedation when children undergoing MR imaging are difficult to sedate.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

All 87 children in the study either could not be sedated with chloral hydrate alone or were mentally retarded. Thioridazine (2-4 mg/kg) was administered orally 2 hr before and chloral hydrate (50-100 mg/kg) was administered orally 30 min before the 104 MR examinations. All children were monitored by continuous pulse oximetry. All images were individually evaluated by pediatric radiologists and were graded acceptable if they contained only minimal motion artifact or no motion artifact. Studies were considered successful only when 95% or more of the images were acceptable.

RESULTS

MR imaging was successful in 93 (89%) of 104 examinations. The success rate for children entered into the study because of prior failure of chloral hydrate sedation was not significantly different from the success rate for children with mental retardation. A tendency for increasing failure rate with age was not significant. No serious complications occurred during the study. The most common adverse reaction, transient reduced oxygen saturation, was seen in five children. Other adverse effects encountered were vomiting in four children, hyperactivity in two children, transient tachycardia in one child, and prolonged sedation in one child. No child required hospitalization because of an adverse reaction to sedation.

CONCLUSION

The study indicates that thioridazine is a safe and effective adjunct to chloral hydrate when a child undergoing MR imaging is difficult to sedate.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA 19134.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8010205

Citation

Greenberg, S B., et al. "Sedation of Difficult-to-sedate Children Undergoing MR Imaging: Value of Thioridazine as an Adjunct to Chloral Hydrate." AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology, vol. 163, no. 1, 1994, pp. 165-8.
Greenberg SB, Faerber EN, Radke JL, et al. Sedation of difficult-to-sedate children undergoing MR imaging: value of thioridazine as an adjunct to chloral hydrate. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1994;163(1):165-8.
Greenberg, S. B., Faerber, E. N., Radke, J. L., Aspinall, C. L., Adams, R. C., & Mercer-Wilson, D. D. (1994). Sedation of difficult-to-sedate children undergoing MR imaging: value of thioridazine as an adjunct to chloral hydrate. AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology, 163(1), pp. 165-8.
Greenberg SB, et al. Sedation of Difficult-to-sedate Children Undergoing MR Imaging: Value of Thioridazine as an Adjunct to Chloral Hydrate. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1994;163(1):165-8. PubMed PMID: 8010205.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sedation of difficult-to-sedate children undergoing MR imaging: value of thioridazine as an adjunct to chloral hydrate. AU - Greenberg,S B, AU - Faerber,E N, AU - Radke,J L, AU - Aspinall,C L, AU - Adams,R C, AU - Mercer-Wilson,D D, PY - 1994/7/1/pubmed PY - 1994/7/1/medline PY - 1994/7/1/entrez SP - 165 EP - 8 JF - AJR. American journal of roentgenology JO - AJR Am J Roentgenol VL - 163 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of thioridazine as an adjunct to chloral hydrate sedation when children undergoing MR imaging are difficult to sedate. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: All 87 children in the study either could not be sedated with chloral hydrate alone or were mentally retarded. Thioridazine (2-4 mg/kg) was administered orally 2 hr before and chloral hydrate (50-100 mg/kg) was administered orally 30 min before the 104 MR examinations. All children were monitored by continuous pulse oximetry. All images were individually evaluated by pediatric radiologists and were graded acceptable if they contained only minimal motion artifact or no motion artifact. Studies were considered successful only when 95% or more of the images were acceptable. RESULTS: MR imaging was successful in 93 (89%) of 104 examinations. The success rate for children entered into the study because of prior failure of chloral hydrate sedation was not significantly different from the success rate for children with mental retardation. A tendency for increasing failure rate with age was not significant. No serious complications occurred during the study. The most common adverse reaction, transient reduced oxygen saturation, was seen in five children. Other adverse effects encountered were vomiting in four children, hyperactivity in two children, transient tachycardia in one child, and prolonged sedation in one child. No child required hospitalization because of an adverse reaction to sedation. CONCLUSION: The study indicates that thioridazine is a safe and effective adjunct to chloral hydrate when a child undergoing MR imaging is difficult to sedate. SN - 0361-803X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8010205/Sedation_of_difficult_to_sedate_children_undergoing_MR_imaging:_value_of_thioridazine_as_an_adjunct_to_chloral_hydrate_ L2 - http://www.ajronline.org/doi/full/10.2214/ajr.163.1.8010205 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -