Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Postprandial hypotension in 499 elderly persons in a long-term health care facility.
J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994 Sep; 42(9):930-2.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To present baseline data from a prospective study of postprandial hypotension in 499 elderly persons in a long-term health care facility.

DESIGN

Analyses of baseline data for a prospective study.

SETTING

A large long-term health care facility where 499 ambulatory or wheelchair-bound residents were studied.

PATIENTS

The 499 residents were > or = 62 years of age, mean age 80 +/- 9 years (range 62-100), 71% female, 29% male, 66% white, 27% black, 7% Hispanic, 68% ambulatory, and 32% wheelchair-bound.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic and diastolic blood pressures was 15 +/- 6 mm Hg/6 +/- 2 mm Hg. The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure occurred 15 minutes after eating in 13% of residents, 30 minutes after eating in 20% of residents, 45 minutes after eating in 26% of residents, 60 minutes after eating in 30% of residents, and 75 minutes after eating in 11% of residents. Of 499 residents, 118 (24%) had a maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure of > or = 20 mm Hg. The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 24 +/- 5 mm Hg in residents with syncope in the prior 6 months and 14 +/- 5 mm Hg in residents without syncope (P < 0.0001). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 21 +/- 5 mm Hg in residents with falls in the preceding 6 months and 13 +/- 4 mm Hg in residents without falls (P < 0.0001). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was significantly greater in residents treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, nitrates, digoxin, and psychotropic drugs than in residents not treated with these drugs. The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic and diastolic blood pressures was not significantly different in elderly blacks, Hispanics, and whites.

CONCLUSIONS

A more severe reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure correlates with a history of syncope or falls in the previous 6 months. Long-term follow-up is being planned to determine whether a marked reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure in elderly persons correlates with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hebrew Hospital Home, Bronx, New York 10475.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8064099

Citation

Aronow, W S., and C Ahn. "Postprandial Hypotension in 499 Elderly Persons in a Long-term Health Care Facility." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 42, no. 9, 1994, pp. 930-2.
Aronow WS, Ahn C. Postprandial hypotension in 499 elderly persons in a long-term health care facility. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994;42(9):930-2.
Aronow, W. S., & Ahn, C. (1994). Postprandial hypotension in 499 elderly persons in a long-term health care facility. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 42(9), 930-2.
Aronow WS, Ahn C. Postprandial Hypotension in 499 Elderly Persons in a Long-term Health Care Facility. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1994;42(9):930-2. PubMed PMID: 8064099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial hypotension in 499 elderly persons in a long-term health care facility. AU - Aronow,W S, AU - Ahn,C, PY - 1994/9/1/pubmed PY - 1994/9/1/medline PY - 1994/9/1/entrez SP - 930 EP - 2 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 42 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To present baseline data from a prospective study of postprandial hypotension in 499 elderly persons in a long-term health care facility. DESIGN: Analyses of baseline data for a prospective study. SETTING: A large long-term health care facility where 499 ambulatory or wheelchair-bound residents were studied. PATIENTS: The 499 residents were > or = 62 years of age, mean age 80 +/- 9 years (range 62-100), 71% female, 29% male, 66% white, 27% black, 7% Hispanic, 68% ambulatory, and 32% wheelchair-bound. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic and diastolic blood pressures was 15 +/- 6 mm Hg/6 +/- 2 mm Hg. The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure occurred 15 minutes after eating in 13% of residents, 30 minutes after eating in 20% of residents, 45 minutes after eating in 26% of residents, 60 minutes after eating in 30% of residents, and 75 minutes after eating in 11% of residents. Of 499 residents, 118 (24%) had a maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure of > or = 20 mm Hg. The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 24 +/- 5 mm Hg in residents with syncope in the prior 6 months and 14 +/- 5 mm Hg in residents without syncope (P < 0.0001). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was 21 +/- 5 mm Hg in residents with falls in the preceding 6 months and 13 +/- 4 mm Hg in residents without falls (P < 0.0001). The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic blood pressure was significantly greater in residents treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, nitrates, digoxin, and psychotropic drugs than in residents not treated with these drugs. The mean maximal decrease in postprandial systolic and diastolic blood pressures was not significantly different in elderly blacks, Hispanics, and whites. CONCLUSIONS: A more severe reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure correlates with a history of syncope or falls in the previous 6 months. Long-term follow-up is being planned to determine whether a marked reduction in postprandial systolic blood pressure in elderly persons correlates with a higher incidence of falls, syncope, new coronary events, new stroke, and total mortality. SN - 0002-8614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8064099/Postprandial_hypotension_in_499_elderly_persons_in_a_long_term_health_care_facility_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0002-8614&amp;date=1994&amp;volume=42&amp;issue=9&amp;spage=930 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -