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Gastric atony and the Roux syndrome.
Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1994 Jun; 23(2):327-43.GC

Abstract

The Roux limb syndrome is a symptom complex characterized by chronic postprandial epigastric pain, fullness, and vomiting observed in approximately one third of patients after gastric reconstructive surgery for reflux gastritis and other conditions in which vagotomy and Roux-en-Y gastroenterostomy have been preformed. The etiology of the symptom complex is controversial, with experimental evidence in animal and human studies suggesting dysfunction of both the gastric remnant and the Roux limb itself. Medical treatment is successful in only about half of cases, but surgical treatment to remove most or all of the gastric remnant is usually successful. These observations suggest that most of the symptoms of the Roux limb syndrome arise from postvagotomy gastric atony.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8070915

Citation

Schirmer, B D.. "Gastric Atony and the Roux Syndrome." Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, vol. 23, no. 2, 1994, pp. 327-43.
Schirmer BD. Gastric atony and the Roux syndrome. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1994;23(2):327-43.
Schirmer, B. D. (1994). Gastric atony and the Roux syndrome. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, 23(2), 327-43.
Schirmer BD. Gastric Atony and the Roux Syndrome. Gastroenterol Clin North Am. 1994;23(2):327-43. PubMed PMID: 8070915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gastric atony and the Roux syndrome. A1 - Schirmer,B D, PY - 1994/6/1/pubmed PY - 1994/6/1/medline PY - 1994/6/1/entrez SP - 327 EP - 43 JF - Gastroenterology clinics of North America JO - Gastroenterol Clin North Am VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - The Roux limb syndrome is a symptom complex characterized by chronic postprandial epigastric pain, fullness, and vomiting observed in approximately one third of patients after gastric reconstructive surgery for reflux gastritis and other conditions in which vagotomy and Roux-en-Y gastroenterostomy have been preformed. The etiology of the symptom complex is controversial, with experimental evidence in animal and human studies suggesting dysfunction of both the gastric remnant and the Roux limb itself. Medical treatment is successful in only about half of cases, but surgical treatment to remove most or all of the gastric remnant is usually successful. These observations suggest that most of the symptoms of the Roux limb syndrome arise from postvagotomy gastric atony. SN - 0889-8553 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8070915/Gastric_atony_and_the_Roux_syndrome_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -