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The influence of dietary factors on the risk of urinary stone formation.
Scanning Microsc. 1993 Sep; 7(3):1119-27; discussion 1127-8.SM

Abstract

The action of various beverages and foods on the composition of the urine in the circadian rhythm and in the 24-hour urine has been investigated under standardized conditions. Orange juice leads to a significant increase of urinary pH and citric acid excretion. Black tea leads to a raised excretion of oxalic acid by only 7.9%. In the short term, beer increases diuresis, but afterwards leads to a compensatory antidiuresis with increased risk of stone formation. Depending on their composition, mineral waters have very different effects on the urinary constituents. Milk as well as cocoa beverage significantly increase calcium excretion; moreover, cocoa causes an increase in the oxalic acid excretion. The leafy vegetable foods containing oxalate, e.g., spinach and rhubarb, lead to peaks of oxalate excretion of 300-400% in the circadian excretion curve. Cheese leads to a significant rise of calcium excretion with acidification of the urine and lowering of citrate excretion. Calcium excretion is increased by 30% by sodium chloride. Foods containing purine result in an increased uric acid excretion over several days. Depending on their phytic acid content, brans bind calcium, but lead to an increased oxalic acid excretion. Analysis of the urine indicates that average diet in Germany entails a high risk of urinary stone formation. As a result of the change to a balanced mixed or vegetarian diet, according to the requirements, significant alterations in urinary pH, calcium, magnesium, uric acid, citric acid, cystine, and glycosaminoglycan excretion are measured, resulting in a drastic reduction in the risk of urinary stone formation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of Bonn, Federal Republic of Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8146611

Citation

Hesse, A, et al. "The Influence of Dietary Factors On the Risk of Urinary Stone Formation." Scanning Microscopy, vol. 7, no. 3, 1993, pp. 1119-27; discussion 1127-8.
Hesse A, Siener R, Heynck H, et al. The influence of dietary factors on the risk of urinary stone formation. Scanning Microsc. 1993;7(3):1119-27; discussion 1127-8.
Hesse, A., Siener, R., Heynck, H., & Jahnen, A. (1993). The influence of dietary factors on the risk of urinary stone formation. Scanning Microscopy, 7(3), 1119-27; discussion 1127-8.
Hesse A, et al. The Influence of Dietary Factors On the Risk of Urinary Stone Formation. Scanning Microsc. 1993;7(3):1119-27; discussion 1127-8. PubMed PMID: 8146611.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of dietary factors on the risk of urinary stone formation. AU - Hesse,A, AU - Siener,R, AU - Heynck,H, AU - Jahnen,A, PY - 1993/9/1/pubmed PY - 1993/9/1/medline PY - 1993/9/1/entrez SP - 1119-27; discussion 1127-8 JF - Scanning microscopy JO - Scanning Microsc. VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - The action of various beverages and foods on the composition of the urine in the circadian rhythm and in the 24-hour urine has been investigated under standardized conditions. Orange juice leads to a significant increase of urinary pH and citric acid excretion. Black tea leads to a raised excretion of oxalic acid by only 7.9%. In the short term, beer increases diuresis, but afterwards leads to a compensatory antidiuresis with increased risk of stone formation. Depending on their composition, mineral waters have very different effects on the urinary constituents. Milk as well as cocoa beverage significantly increase calcium excretion; moreover, cocoa causes an increase in the oxalic acid excretion. The leafy vegetable foods containing oxalate, e.g., spinach and rhubarb, lead to peaks of oxalate excretion of 300-400% in the circadian excretion curve. Cheese leads to a significant rise of calcium excretion with acidification of the urine and lowering of citrate excretion. Calcium excretion is increased by 30% by sodium chloride. Foods containing purine result in an increased uric acid excretion over several days. Depending on their phytic acid content, brans bind calcium, but lead to an increased oxalic acid excretion. Analysis of the urine indicates that average diet in Germany entails a high risk of urinary stone formation. As a result of the change to a balanced mixed or vegetarian diet, according to the requirements, significant alterations in urinary pH, calcium, magnesium, uric acid, citric acid, cystine, and glycosaminoglycan excretion are measured, resulting in a drastic reduction in the risk of urinary stone formation. SN - 0891-7035 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8146611/The_influence_of_dietary_factors_on_the_risk_of_urinary_stone_formation_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/nutrition.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -