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Impact of myristic acid versus palmitic acid on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels in healthy women and men.
Arterioscler Thromb 1994; 14(4):567-75AT

Abstract

The cholesterol-raising effect of dietary saturated fatty acids is largely accounted for by lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids. Dairy fat is a major source of myristic acid, and palm oil is especially rich in palmitic acid. Myristic acid is suspected of being much more cholesterolemic than palmitic acid, but direct comparisons have been lacking. We therefore fed 36 women and 23 men three diets that differed from each other in palmitic, oleic, and myristic acid content by about 10% of total energy. We used palm oil, high-oleic acid sunflower oil, and a specially produced high-myristic acid fat to achieve these differences. Each diet was consumed for 3 weeks in random order. Mean serum cholesterol was 4.53 mmol/L on the high-oleic acid diet, 4.96 mmol/L on the palmitic acid diet, and 5.19 mmol/L on the myristic acid diet (P < .0001 for all comparisons). Myristic acid raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 0.11 mmol/L, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 0.12 mmol/L, and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I by 7.2 mg/dL relative to palmitic acid; increases relative to oleic acid were 0.50 mmol/L for LDL cholesterol, 0.15 mmol/L for HDL cholesterol, 6.0 mg/dL for apoB, and 8.9 mg/dL for apoA-I (P < .01 for all comparisons). The HDL cholesterol and apoA-I levels on the palmitic and oleic acid diets were the same. None of the responses differed significantly between woman and men. Myristic acid and palmitic acid both caused high LDL cholesterol and apoB levels and low HDL to LDL ratios.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutrition, Wageningen Agricultural University, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8148355

Citation

Zock, P L., et al. "Impact of Myristic Acid Versus Palmitic Acid On Serum Lipid and Lipoprotein Levels in Healthy Women and Men." Arteriosclerosis and Thrombosis : a Journal of Vascular Biology, vol. 14, no. 4, 1994, pp. 567-75.
Zock PL, de Vries JH, Katan MB. Impact of myristic acid versus palmitic acid on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels in healthy women and men. Arterioscler Thromb. 1994;14(4):567-75.
Zock, P. L., de Vries, J. H., & Katan, M. B. (1994). Impact of myristic acid versus palmitic acid on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels in healthy women and men. Arteriosclerosis and Thrombosis : a Journal of Vascular Biology, 14(4), pp. 567-75.
Zock PL, de Vries JH, Katan MB. Impact of Myristic Acid Versus Palmitic Acid On Serum Lipid and Lipoprotein Levels in Healthy Women and Men. Arterioscler Thromb. 1994;14(4):567-75. PubMed PMID: 8148355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of myristic acid versus palmitic acid on serum lipid and lipoprotein levels in healthy women and men. AU - Zock,P L, AU - de Vries,J H, AU - Katan,M B, PY - 1994/4/1/pubmed PY - 1994/4/1/medline PY - 1994/4/1/entrez SP - 567 EP - 75 JF - Arteriosclerosis and thrombosis : a journal of vascular biology JO - Arterioscler. Thromb. VL - 14 IS - 4 N2 - The cholesterol-raising effect of dietary saturated fatty acids is largely accounted for by lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids. Dairy fat is a major source of myristic acid, and palm oil is especially rich in palmitic acid. Myristic acid is suspected of being much more cholesterolemic than palmitic acid, but direct comparisons have been lacking. We therefore fed 36 women and 23 men three diets that differed from each other in palmitic, oleic, and myristic acid content by about 10% of total energy. We used palm oil, high-oleic acid sunflower oil, and a specially produced high-myristic acid fat to achieve these differences. Each diet was consumed for 3 weeks in random order. Mean serum cholesterol was 4.53 mmol/L on the high-oleic acid diet, 4.96 mmol/L on the palmitic acid diet, and 5.19 mmol/L on the myristic acid diet (P < .0001 for all comparisons). Myristic acid raised low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by 0.11 mmol/L, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 0.12 mmol/L, and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I by 7.2 mg/dL relative to palmitic acid; increases relative to oleic acid were 0.50 mmol/L for LDL cholesterol, 0.15 mmol/L for HDL cholesterol, 6.0 mg/dL for apoB, and 8.9 mg/dL for apoA-I (P < .01 for all comparisons). The HDL cholesterol and apoA-I levels on the palmitic and oleic acid diets were the same. None of the responses differed significantly between woman and men. Myristic acid and palmitic acid both caused high LDL cholesterol and apoB levels and low HDL to LDL ratios.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 1049-8834 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8148355/Impact_of_myristic_acid_versus_palmitic_acid_on_serum_lipid_and_lipoprotein_levels_in_healthy_women_and_men_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=8148355.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -