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[Blind treatment or treatment oriented to intestinal parasitoses in a Parisian health center for refugees].
Sante. 1994 Jan-Feb; 4(1):21-6.S

Abstract

The Comede health care center for political refugees received 4,414 first arrivals from 70 African, Asian and South American countries in 1989. Many arrived from areas where intestinal parasitic infections are endemic, and where infections by nematodes (Ancyclostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis), trematodes (Schistosoma hematobium, Schistosoma stercoralis) and protozoa (Entamoeba coli) cause significant morbidity. The question that arises is whether we should screen stools and urine only in the case of African refugees, or treat all refugees empirically (mass treatment program). We carried out a retrospective study of 1,425 patients seen for the first time in the Comede from August 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989. Three-quarters of the subjects were men and the mean age was 29 years. 63.2% of the subjects were from 28 African countries, 18.6% from 8 Asian countries, 10% from 5 South American countries and the West Indies, and 6.4% from 4 countries of the Mediterranean basin. 4 countries of the Mediterranean basin. All the subjects were asked to provide stool and urine specimens at the Paris City Laboratory, which were examined using the merthiolate iodo formol direct methods, two concentration methods (MIF and Kato) and Baermann's technique. Patients with infestations were prescribed appropriate treatment at a second visit, compliance with which was good (86%). The prevalence of intestinal parasite infections was 60%. Albendazole was given to 44% of patients, while 45% of African patients were given praziquantel and 2.7% tinidazole.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hôpital Bicêtre, Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

8162360

Citation

Lamour, P, et al. "[Blind Treatment or Treatment Oriented to Intestinal Parasitoses in a Parisian Health Center for Refugees]." Sante (Montrouge, France), vol. 4, no. 1, 1994, pp. 21-6.
Lamour P, Bourée P, Hennequin C, et al. [Blind treatment or treatment oriented to intestinal parasitoses in a Parisian health center for refugees]. Sante. 1994;4(1):21-6.
Lamour, P., Bourée, P., Hennequin, C., Lombrail, P., Squinazi, F., Roussel, C., & Brodin, M. (1994). [Blind treatment or treatment oriented to intestinal parasitoses in a Parisian health center for refugees]. Sante (Montrouge, France), 4(1), 21-6.
Lamour P, et al. [Blind Treatment or Treatment Oriented to Intestinal Parasitoses in a Parisian Health Center for Refugees]. Sante. 1994 Jan-Feb;4(1):21-6. PubMed PMID: 8162360.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Blind treatment or treatment oriented to intestinal parasitoses in a Parisian health center for refugees]. AU - Lamour,P, AU - Bourée,P, AU - Hennequin,C, AU - Lombrail,P, AU - Squinazi,F, AU - Roussel,C, AU - Brodin,M, PY - 1994/1/1/pubmed PY - 1994/1/1/medline PY - 1994/1/1/entrez SP - 21 EP - 6 JF - Sante (Montrouge, France) JO - Sante VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - The Comede health care center for political refugees received 4,414 first arrivals from 70 African, Asian and South American countries in 1989. Many arrived from areas where intestinal parasitic infections are endemic, and where infections by nematodes (Ancyclostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis), trematodes (Schistosoma hematobium, Schistosoma stercoralis) and protozoa (Entamoeba coli) cause significant morbidity. The question that arises is whether we should screen stools and urine only in the case of African refugees, or treat all refugees empirically (mass treatment program). We carried out a retrospective study of 1,425 patients seen for the first time in the Comede from August 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989. Three-quarters of the subjects were men and the mean age was 29 years. 63.2% of the subjects were from 28 African countries, 18.6% from 8 Asian countries, 10% from 5 South American countries and the West Indies, and 6.4% from 4 countries of the Mediterranean basin. 4 countries of the Mediterranean basin. All the subjects were asked to provide stool and urine specimens at the Paris City Laboratory, which were examined using the merthiolate iodo formol direct methods, two concentration methods (MIF and Kato) and Baermann's technique. Patients with infestations were prescribed appropriate treatment at a second visit, compliance with which was good (86%). The prevalence of intestinal parasite infections was 60%. Albendazole was given to 44% of patients, while 45% of African patients were given praziquantel and 2.7% tinidazole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 1157-5999 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8162360/[Blind_treatment_or_treatment_oriented_to_intestinal_parasitoses_in_a_Parisian_health_center_for_refugees]_ L2 - http://www.jle.com/medline.md?issn=1157-5999&vol=4&iss=1&page=21 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -