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Content and bioavailability of trace elements in vegetarian diets.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 05; 59(5 Suppl):1223S-1232S.AJ

Abstract

This review compares the content and major food sources of copper, manganese, selenium, and zinc in vegetarian and omnivorous diets. Interactions affecting trace element bioavailability and their impact on the trace element status of vegetarians are discussed. Adult vegetarian diets often have a lower zinc and selenium content but a higher copper and manganese content compared with omnivorous diets. Cereals are the primary sources of copper, manganese, and selenium in most diets and the major source of zinc in many vegetarian diets; flesh floods are the primary source of zinc and secondary source of selenium in omnivorous diets. Despite the apparent lower bioavailability of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium in vegetarian diets because of the high contents of phytic acid and/or dietary fiber and the low content of flesh foods in the diet, the trace element status of most adult vegetarians appears to be adequate. Children, however, appear to be more vulnerable to suboptimal zinc status, presumably because of their high zinc requirements for growth and their bodies' failure to adapt to a vegetarian diet by increased absorption of dietary zinc.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Applied Human Nutrition, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8172126

Citation

Gibson, R S.. "Content and Bioavailability of Trace Elements in Vegetarian Diets." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 5 Suppl, 1994, 1223S-1232S.
Gibson RS. Content and bioavailability of trace elements in vegetarian diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;59(5 Suppl):1223S-1232S.
Gibson, R. S. (1994). Content and bioavailability of trace elements in vegetarian diets. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(5 Suppl), 1223S-1232S. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/59.5.1223S
Gibson RS. Content and Bioavailability of Trace Elements in Vegetarian Diets. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;59(5 Suppl):1223S-1232S. PubMed PMID: 8172126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Content and bioavailability of trace elements in vegetarian diets. A1 - Gibson,R S, PY - 1994/5/1/pubmed PY - 1994/5/1/medline PY - 1994/5/1/entrez SP - 1223S EP - 1232S JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 59 IS - 5 Suppl N2 - This review compares the content and major food sources of copper, manganese, selenium, and zinc in vegetarian and omnivorous diets. Interactions affecting trace element bioavailability and their impact on the trace element status of vegetarians are discussed. Adult vegetarian diets often have a lower zinc and selenium content but a higher copper and manganese content compared with omnivorous diets. Cereals are the primary sources of copper, manganese, and selenium in most diets and the major source of zinc in many vegetarian diets; flesh floods are the primary source of zinc and secondary source of selenium in omnivorous diets. Despite the apparent lower bioavailability of zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium in vegetarian diets because of the high contents of phytic acid and/or dietary fiber and the low content of flesh foods in the diet, the trace element status of most adult vegetarians appears to be adequate. Children, however, appear to be more vulnerable to suboptimal zinc status, presumably because of their high zinc requirements for growth and their bodies' failure to adapt to a vegetarian diet by increased absorption of dietary zinc. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8172126/Content_and_bioavailability_of_trace_elements_in_vegetarian_diets_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/59.5.1223S DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -