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Coagulation and anticoagulation effects of contraceptive steroids.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1994 May; 170(5 Pt 2):1523-7.AJ

Abstract

Epidemiologic data support the notion that first-generation high-dose oral contraceptives (containing > 80 micrograms of estrogen) increased the incidence of thromboembolic events. The quantitative interpretation of these data is difficult because results were often confounded by life-style factors and inadequate diagnostic procedures. With the introduction of modern low-dose combination oral contraceptives, the incidence of thromboembolic events decreased markedly. Although all combined oral contraceptives induce statistically significant changes in hemostatic factors, these changes are generally within normal ranges, and their clinical significance is questionable. Overall, increased activity in hemostatic mechanisms appears to remain in balance. Progestin-only formulations seem to affect hemostatic parameters to a much lesser degree, and their use has not led to an increased risk of thrombosis. Interindividual variations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of contraceptive steroids are great and could tentatively explain why certain persons may be at an increased risk of thrombosis. Although most studies have looked at steady-state conditions during contraceptive steroid intake, it would seem prudent to investigate further the hemostatic system during a non-steady-state condition, such as that occurring during the first few days of the pill-free interval.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Lund University, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8178901

Citation

Samsioe, G. "Coagulation and Anticoagulation Effects of Contraceptive Steroids." American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 170, no. 5 Pt 2, 1994, pp. 1523-7.
Samsioe G. Coagulation and anticoagulation effects of contraceptive steroids. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1994;170(5 Pt 2):1523-7.
Samsioe, G. (1994). Coagulation and anticoagulation effects of contraceptive steroids. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 170(5 Pt 2), 1523-7.
Samsioe G. Coagulation and Anticoagulation Effects of Contraceptive Steroids. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1994;170(5 Pt 2):1523-7. PubMed PMID: 8178901.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coagulation and anticoagulation effects of contraceptive steroids. A1 - Samsioe,G, PY - 1994/5/1/pubmed PY - 1994/5/1/medline PY - 1994/5/1/entrez KW - Biology KW - Blood Coagulation Effects KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Agents KW - Contraceptive Agents, Female--pharmacodynamics KW - Contraceptive Agents, Progestin KW - Contraceptive Agents--pharmacodynamics KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Diseases KW - Embolism KW - Family Planning KW - Hematological Effects KW - Hemic System KW - Literature Review KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Oral Contraceptives, Combined KW - Physiology KW - Progestins, Low-dose KW - Thromboembolism KW - Thrombosis KW - Vascular Diseases SP - 1523 EP - 7 JF - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology JO - Am J Obstet Gynecol VL - 170 IS - 5 Pt 2 N2 - Epidemiologic data support the notion that first-generation high-dose oral contraceptives (containing > 80 micrograms of estrogen) increased the incidence of thromboembolic events. The quantitative interpretation of these data is difficult because results were often confounded by life-style factors and inadequate diagnostic procedures. With the introduction of modern low-dose combination oral contraceptives, the incidence of thromboembolic events decreased markedly. Although all combined oral contraceptives induce statistically significant changes in hemostatic factors, these changes are generally within normal ranges, and their clinical significance is questionable. Overall, increased activity in hemostatic mechanisms appears to remain in balance. Progestin-only formulations seem to affect hemostatic parameters to a much lesser degree, and their use has not led to an increased risk of thrombosis. Interindividual variations in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of contraceptive steroids are great and could tentatively explain why certain persons may be at an increased risk of thrombosis. Although most studies have looked at steady-state conditions during contraceptive steroid intake, it would seem prudent to investigate further the hemostatic system during a non-steady-state condition, such as that occurring during the first few days of the pill-free interval. SN - 0002-9378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8178901/Coagulation_and_anticoagulation_effects_of_contraceptive_steroids_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/a54049 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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