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Effect of ascorbic acid on apparent iron absorption by women with low iron stores.
Am J Clin Nutr. 1994 Jun; 59(6):1381-5.AJ

Abstract

The effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on apparent iron absorption was tested in women with low iron stores. For 10 wk, 25 healthy nonpregnant women, aged 20-45 y with low serum ferritin (3.5-17.7 micrograms/L), consumed either a diet with predicted poorly bioavailable iron or a typical Western diet, classified according to dietary meat and ascorbic acid contents. Meals were supplemented with ascorbic acid (500 mg, three times a day) for 5 of the 10 wk, in a double-blind, crossover design. Ascorbic acid did not affect most biochemical indexes of iron status, the biological half-life of 59Fe, or apparent iron absorption (diet-feces) from either diet, but slightly increased serum ferritin (11.9 vs 10.7 micrograms/L, P < 0.06) when data from both diets were combined. These results support other evidence that ascorbic acid has less effect on iron bioavailability than has been predicted from tests with single meals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, ND 58202-9034.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8198064

Citation

Hunt, J R., et al. "Effect of Ascorbic Acid On Apparent Iron Absorption By Women With Low Iron Stores." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 6, 1994, pp. 1381-5.
Hunt JR, Gallagher SK, Johnson LK. Effect of ascorbic acid on apparent iron absorption by women with low iron stores. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;59(6):1381-5.
Hunt, J. R., Gallagher, S. K., & Johnson, L. K. (1994). Effect of ascorbic acid on apparent iron absorption by women with low iron stores. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(6), 1381-5.
Hunt JR, Gallagher SK, Johnson LK. Effect of Ascorbic Acid On Apparent Iron Absorption By Women With Low Iron Stores. Am J Clin Nutr. 1994;59(6):1381-5. PubMed PMID: 8198064.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of ascorbic acid on apparent iron absorption by women with low iron stores. AU - Hunt,J R, AU - Gallagher,S K, AU - Johnson,L K, PY - 1994/6/1/pubmed PY - 1994/6/1/medline PY - 1994/6/1/entrez SP - 1381 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 59 IS - 6 N2 - The effect of ascorbic acid supplementation on apparent iron absorption was tested in women with low iron stores. For 10 wk, 25 healthy nonpregnant women, aged 20-45 y with low serum ferritin (3.5-17.7 micrograms/L), consumed either a diet with predicted poorly bioavailable iron or a typical Western diet, classified according to dietary meat and ascorbic acid contents. Meals were supplemented with ascorbic acid (500 mg, three times a day) for 5 of the 10 wk, in a double-blind, crossover design. Ascorbic acid did not affect most biochemical indexes of iron status, the biological half-life of 59Fe, or apparent iron absorption (diet-feces) from either diet, but slightly increased serum ferritin (11.9 vs 10.7 micrograms/L, P < 0.06) when data from both diets were combined. These results support other evidence that ascorbic acid has less effect on iron bioavailability than has been predicted from tests with single meals. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8198064/Effect_of_ascorbic_acid_on_apparent_iron_absorption_by_women_with_low_iron_stores_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/59.6.1381 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -