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Intestinal permeability in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.
Am J Gastroenterol. 1994 Jun; 89(6):878-82.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The etiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) enteropathy is unknown. This condition has been associated with malabsorption and villous atrophy. Other disorders with similar findings, including celiac disease, are characterized by altered intestinal permeability. Our objective was to confirm (or reject) our hypothesis that processes that cause increased permeability may occur in patients with AIDS, and thus be a cause of idiopathic diarrhea.

METHODS

A lactulose-mannitol differential intestinal permeability test was performed in healthy controls, asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, and AIDS patients with and without diarrhea.

RESULTS

Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients lactulose and mannitol recoveries were no different than healthy control patients. AIDS patients without diarrhea had lactulose recovery similar to healthy controls and decreased mannitol recoveries; their mean lactulose:mannitol ratio was no different from that of controls, and less than that of AIDS patients with diarrhea. AIDS patients with diarrhea had increased lactulose recovery and decreased mannitol recovery; their mean lactulose:mannitol ratio was significantly greater than the ratios in all the other groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with AIDS and diarrhea have altered intestinal permeability. The decreased absorption of mannitol suggests that the functional absorptive surface of the intestine decreases as HIV disease progresses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Bronx Municipal Hospital Center, New York.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8198098

Citation

Tepper, R E., et al. "Intestinal Permeability in Patients Infected With the Human Immunodeficiency Virus." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 89, no. 6, 1994, pp. 878-82.
Tepper RE, Simon D, Brandt LJ, et al. Intestinal permeability in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. Am J Gastroenterol. 1994;89(6):878-82.
Tepper, R. E., Simon, D., Brandt, L. J., Nutovits, R., & Lee, M. J. (1994). Intestinal permeability in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 89(6), 878-82.
Tepper RE, et al. Intestinal Permeability in Patients Infected With the Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Am J Gastroenterol. 1994;89(6):878-82. PubMed PMID: 8198098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal permeability in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. AU - Tepper,R E, AU - Simon,D, AU - Brandt,L J, AU - Nutovits,R, AU - Lee,M J, PY - 1994/6/1/pubmed PY - 1994/6/1/medline PY - 1994/6/1/entrez SP - 878 EP - 82 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 89 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The etiology of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) enteropathy is unknown. This condition has been associated with malabsorption and villous atrophy. Other disorders with similar findings, including celiac disease, are characterized by altered intestinal permeability. Our objective was to confirm (or reject) our hypothesis that processes that cause increased permeability may occur in patients with AIDS, and thus be a cause of idiopathic diarrhea. METHODS: A lactulose-mannitol differential intestinal permeability test was performed in healthy controls, asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, and AIDS patients with and without diarrhea. RESULTS: Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients lactulose and mannitol recoveries were no different than healthy control patients. AIDS patients without diarrhea had lactulose recovery similar to healthy controls and decreased mannitol recoveries; their mean lactulose:mannitol ratio was no different from that of controls, and less than that of AIDS patients with diarrhea. AIDS patients with diarrhea had increased lactulose recovery and decreased mannitol recovery; their mean lactulose:mannitol ratio was significantly greater than the ratios in all the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with AIDS and diarrhea have altered intestinal permeability. The decreased absorption of mannitol suggests that the functional absorptive surface of the intestine decreases as HIV disease progresses. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8198098/Intestinal_permeability_in_patients_infected_with_the_human_immunodeficiency_virus_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/hivaids.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -