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The problem of somatization in family practice.
Am Fam Physician. 1994 Jun; 49(8):1873-9.AF

Abstract

Patients with somatization disorder, in the full-blown or subsyndromal form, are high users of health care and often receive expensive, unnecessary tests and treatments. Their multiple somatic complaints do not have a biomedical basis but, instead, reflect underlying emotional conflicts that the patient is unable to face. Treatment of these patients is difficult, with no approach showing a good cure rate. However, if the underlying psychosocial etiology is understood and modest goals are set, much can be done to limit the problem and reduce symptoms. Management includes setting clear limits on the patient's access to the physician, while maintaining an empathetic and supportive doctor-patient relationship. Behavioral cognitive psychotherapy and short-term intensive psychotherapy may help the patient understand the underlying conflicts and thereby reduce the symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8203324

Citation

Margo, K L., and G M. Margo. "The Problem of Somatization in Family Practice." American Family Physician, vol. 49, no. 8, 1994, pp. 1873-9.
Margo KL, Margo GM. The problem of somatization in family practice. Am Fam Physician. 1994;49(8):1873-9.
Margo, K. L., & Margo, G. M. (1994). The problem of somatization in family practice. American Family Physician, 49(8), 1873-9.
Margo KL, Margo GM. The Problem of Somatization in Family Practice. Am Fam Physician. 1994;49(8):1873-9. PubMed PMID: 8203324.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The problem of somatization in family practice. AU - Margo,K L, AU - Margo,G M, PY - 1994/6/1/pubmed PY - 1994/6/1/medline PY - 1994/6/1/entrez SP - 1873 EP - 9 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 49 IS - 8 N2 - Patients with somatization disorder, in the full-blown or subsyndromal form, are high users of health care and often receive expensive, unnecessary tests and treatments. Their multiple somatic complaints do not have a biomedical basis but, instead, reflect underlying emotional conflicts that the patient is unable to face. Treatment of these patients is difficult, with no approach showing a good cure rate. However, if the underlying psychosocial etiology is understood and modest goals are set, much can be done to limit the problem and reduce symptoms. Management includes setting clear limits on the patient's access to the physician, while maintaining an empathetic and supportive doctor-patient relationship. Behavioral cognitive psychotherapy and short-term intensive psychotherapy may help the patient understand the underlying conflicts and thereby reduce the symptoms. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8203324/The_problem_of_somatization_in_family_practice_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/talkingwithyourdoctor.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -