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Effects of beef and chicken consumption on plasma lipid levels in hypercholesterolemic men.
Arch Intern Med. 1994 Jun 13; 154(11):1261-7.AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The recommendation to lower saturated fat intake is often interpreted as requiring the elimination of beef to control or lower serum cholesterol levels. The study hypothesis was that the Step I Diet (8% to 10% of energy intake from saturated fatty acids) containing beef would have the same effect on plasma lipid levels of hypercholesterolemic men as a like diet containing chicken.

METHODS

Thirty-eight free-living hypercholesterolemic (otherwise healthy) men completed a 13-week dietary intervention study. Subjects consumed their usual diets for 3 weeks, followed by a 5-week stabilization diet (18% of energy intake from saturated fatty acids), before randomization to one of two test diets for 5 weeks. The test diets contained either 85 g of cooked beef (8% fat) or 85 g of cooked chicken (7% fat) per 4184 kJ and had 7% to 8% of energy from saturated fatty acids. All food was supplied during the stabilization and test diets.

RESULTS

The beef and chicken test diets both produced significant decreases in average plasma total cholesterol level (0.54 mmol/L [7.6%] for beef and 0.70 mmol/L [10.2%] for chicken) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (0.46 mmol/L [9%] for beef and 0.55 mmol/L [11%] for chicken). Changes in average levels of plasma total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were not statistically different (smallest P = .26) between the beef and chicken test diets. The average triglyceride level did not change for either test diet group.

CONCLUSIONS

In this short-term study, comparably lean beef and chicken had similar effects on plasma levels of total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride. We concluded that lean beef and chicken are interchangeable in the Step I Diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Tex.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8203993

Citation

Scott, L W., et al. "Effects of Beef and Chicken Consumption On Plasma Lipid Levels in Hypercholesterolemic Men." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 154, no. 11, 1994, pp. 1261-7.
Scott LW, Dunn JK, Pownall HJ, et al. Effects of beef and chicken consumption on plasma lipid levels in hypercholesterolemic men. Arch Intern Med. 1994;154(11):1261-7.
Scott, L. W., Dunn, J. K., Pownall, H. J., Brauchi, D. J., McMann, M. C., Herd, J. A., Harris, K. B., Savell, J. W., Cross, H. R., & Gotto, A. M. (1994). Effects of beef and chicken consumption on plasma lipid levels in hypercholesterolemic men. Archives of Internal Medicine, 154(11), 1261-7.
Scott LW, et al. Effects of Beef and Chicken Consumption On Plasma Lipid Levels in Hypercholesterolemic Men. Arch Intern Med. 1994 Jun 13;154(11):1261-7. PubMed PMID: 8203993.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of beef and chicken consumption on plasma lipid levels in hypercholesterolemic men. AU - Scott,L W, AU - Dunn,J K, AU - Pownall,H J, AU - Brauchi,D J, AU - McMann,M C, AU - Herd,J A, AU - Harris,K B, AU - Savell,J W, AU - Cross,H R, AU - Gotto,A M,Jr PY - 1994/6/13/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1994/6/13/entrez SP - 1261 EP - 7 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch Intern Med VL - 154 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: The recommendation to lower saturated fat intake is often interpreted as requiring the elimination of beef to control or lower serum cholesterol levels. The study hypothesis was that the Step I Diet (8% to 10% of energy intake from saturated fatty acids) containing beef would have the same effect on plasma lipid levels of hypercholesterolemic men as a like diet containing chicken. METHODS: Thirty-eight free-living hypercholesterolemic (otherwise healthy) men completed a 13-week dietary intervention study. Subjects consumed their usual diets for 3 weeks, followed by a 5-week stabilization diet (18% of energy intake from saturated fatty acids), before randomization to one of two test diets for 5 weeks. The test diets contained either 85 g of cooked beef (8% fat) or 85 g of cooked chicken (7% fat) per 4184 kJ and had 7% to 8% of energy from saturated fatty acids. All food was supplied during the stabilization and test diets. RESULTS: The beef and chicken test diets both produced significant decreases in average plasma total cholesterol level (0.54 mmol/L [7.6%] for beef and 0.70 mmol/L [10.2%] for chicken) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (0.46 mmol/L [9%] for beef and 0.55 mmol/L [11%] for chicken). Changes in average levels of plasma total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were not statistically different (smallest P = .26) between the beef and chicken test diets. The average triglyceride level did not change for either test diet group. CONCLUSIONS: In this short-term study, comparably lean beef and chicken had similar effects on plasma levels of total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride. We concluded that lean beef and chicken are interchangeable in the Step I Diet. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8203993/Effects_of_beef_and_chicken_consumption_on_plasma_lipid_levels_in_hypercholesterolemic_men_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/154/pg/1261 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -