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Traveler's diarrhea.
Am Fam Physician. 1993 Oct; 48(5):793-800, 805-6.AF

Abstract

Traveler's diarrhea is the most common health problem in persons who visit developing countries. Dietary precautions are the mainstay of prevention. Since bacteria are responsible for 50 to 80 percent of cases of traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics are the drugs of choice for empiric therapy. Because bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and doxycycline, newer antibiotics, especially the fluoroquinolones, should be considered as first-line therapy. Antimotility agents may help reduce symptoms, but they should not be given to patients who have fever or bloody diarrhea. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for certain high-risk individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Ohio.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8213410

Citation

Heck, J E., and M B. Cohen. "Traveler's Diarrhea." American Family Physician, vol. 48, no. 5, 1993, pp. 793-800, 805-6.
Heck JE, Cohen MB. Traveler's diarrhea. Am Fam Physician. 1993;48(5):793-800, 805-6.
Heck, J. E., & Cohen, M. B. (1993). Traveler's diarrhea. American Family Physician, 48(5), 793-800, 805-6.
Heck JE, Cohen MB. Traveler's Diarrhea. Am Fam Physician. 1993;48(5):793-800, 805-6. PubMed PMID: 8213410.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Traveler's diarrhea. AU - Heck,J E, AU - Cohen,M B, PY - 1993/10/1/pubmed PY - 1993/10/1/medline PY - 1993/10/1/entrez SP - 793-800, 805-6 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 48 IS - 5 N2 - Traveler's diarrhea is the most common health problem in persons who visit developing countries. Dietary precautions are the mainstay of prevention. Since bacteria are responsible for 50 to 80 percent of cases of traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics are the drugs of choice for empiric therapy. Because bacteria are becoming increasingly resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and doxycycline, newer antibiotics, especially the fluoroquinolones, should be considered as first-line therapy. Antimotility agents may help reduce symptoms, but they should not be given to patients who have fever or bloody diarrhea. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for certain high-risk individuals. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8213410/Traveler's_diarrhea_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2258 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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