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Why don't young adults protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV? Possible answers to a complex question.
AIDS Educ Prev. 1993 Fall; 5(3):220-33.AE

Abstract

Using theories of health behavior, this study aimed to advance the understanding of risk-taking regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among young adults by describing: (a) their representation (i.e., schema) about HIV infection, (b) their problems with use of condoms and comfort with safe-sex practices, and (c) situations associated with risky sexual behavior and reported reasons for risk-taking. Participants were 272 young adult college students whose average age was 19.3 years (SD = 2.4). They completed an extensive questionnaire developed for the study. The representation of HIV infection in this sample lacked the specific and detailed information necessary to guide sexual behavior. For example, participants were aware of the causes of sexual transmission of HIV, but many persons indicated uncertainty about the effectiveness of various preventive strategies (e.g., latex condoms, birth control devices). A number of specific problems with using condoms were identified or expected by participants. These included inadequate lubrication, poor fit, and breaks or leaks during intercourse. The majority of the sample (85.3%) reported at least one occurrence of unprotected sexual intercourse. For 60% of them, the stated reason for the risk-taking was that the intercourse was unplanned or spontaneous; 50% reported that they "just knew" the partner was safe and not infected with HIV. Implications for health education programs are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin, Madison 53792-2455.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8217474

Citation

Keller, M L.. "Why Don't Young Adults Protect Themselves Against Sexual Transmission of HIV? Possible Answers to a Complex Question." AIDS Education and Prevention : Official Publication of the International Society for AIDS Education, vol. 5, no. 3, 1993, pp. 220-33.
Keller ML. Why don't young adults protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV? Possible answers to a complex question. AIDS Educ Prev. 1993;5(3):220-33.
Keller, M. L. (1993). Why don't young adults protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV? Possible answers to a complex question. AIDS Education and Prevention : Official Publication of the International Society for AIDS Education, 5(3), 220-33.
Keller ML. Why Don't Young Adults Protect Themselves Against Sexual Transmission of HIV? Possible Answers to a Complex Question. AIDS Educ Prev. 1993;5(3):220-33. PubMed PMID: 8217474.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Why don't young adults protect themselves against sexual transmission of HIV? Possible answers to a complex question. A1 - Keller,M L, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez KW - Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Barrier Methods KW - Behavior KW - Beliefs KW - Condom KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Culture KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Diseases KW - Education KW - Family Planning KW - Hiv Infections KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Obstacles KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Research Report KW - Risk Reduction Behavior KW - Sampling Studies KW - Schools KW - Sex Behavior KW - Students KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - United States KW - Universities KW - Viral Diseases KW - Wisconsin KW - Youth SP - 220 EP - 33 JF - AIDS education and prevention : official publication of the International Society for AIDS Education JO - AIDS Educ Prev VL - 5 IS - 3 N2 - Using theories of health behavior, this study aimed to advance the understanding of risk-taking regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among young adults by describing: (a) their representation (i.e., schema) about HIV infection, (b) their problems with use of condoms and comfort with safe-sex practices, and (c) situations associated with risky sexual behavior and reported reasons for risk-taking. Participants were 272 young adult college students whose average age was 19.3 years (SD = 2.4). They completed an extensive questionnaire developed for the study. The representation of HIV infection in this sample lacked the specific and detailed information necessary to guide sexual behavior. For example, participants were aware of the causes of sexual transmission of HIV, but many persons indicated uncertainty about the effectiveness of various preventive strategies (e.g., latex condoms, birth control devices). A number of specific problems with using condoms were identified or expected by participants. These included inadequate lubrication, poor fit, and breaks or leaks during intercourse. The majority of the sample (85.3%) reported at least one occurrence of unprotected sexual intercourse. For 60% of them, the stated reason for the risk-taking was that the intercourse was unplanned or spontaneous; 50% reported that they "just knew" the partner was safe and not infected with HIV. Implications for health education programs are discussed. SN - 0899-9546 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8217474/Why_don't_young_adults_protect_themselves_against_sexual_transmission_of_HIV_Possible_answers_to_a_complex_question_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9735 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -