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The vascular component of sodium salicylate ototoxicity in the guinea pig.
Hear Res. 1993 Sep; 69(1-2):199-206.HR

Abstract

Drugs of the salicylate family (aspirin-like drugs) are reversibly ototoxic. Electrophysiologic and ultrastructural evidence suggests an impairment of the sensory hair cells of the cochlea following salicylate treatment. In addition, since these drugs can cause vasoconstriction, the ototoxicity of salicylates may also involve an impairment of the blood circulation in inner ear. However, a vascular hypothesis of salicylate toxicity has not received much attention. In the current study, we simultaneously measured cochlear blood flow (by laser Doppler flowmetry) and the sound-evoked potentials from the round window. Sodium salicylate caused a decrease in cochlear blood flow that appeared within 30 min following an intramuscular injection of a low dose of sodium salicylate (100 mg/kg). This sodium salicylate dose did not cause a change in auditory sensitivity. For higher doses (200 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg), both cochlear blood flow and auditory sensitivity were affected. The 300 mg/kg dose decreased blood flow by about 25% and elevated compound action potential thresholds by 10 to 25 dB for high frequencies (> or = 8 kHz). Further experiments showed that salicylate-induced threshold shifts were significantly reduced for the mid-frequencies when cochlear blood flow is increased by the vasodilating drug hydralazine (negating the flow reduction caused by salicylate). These data indicate that in addition to the direct effect of systemically administered salicylate on neurosecretory function a decreased blood flow contributes to the ototoxicity of salicylates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie Sensorielle, Universite Claude Bernard, Villeurbaune, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8226340

Citation

Didier, A, et al. "The Vascular Component of Sodium Salicylate Ototoxicity in the Guinea Pig." Hearing Research, vol. 69, no. 1-2, 1993, pp. 199-206.
Didier A, Miller JM, Nuttall AL. The vascular component of sodium salicylate ototoxicity in the guinea pig. Hear Res. 1993;69(1-2):199-206.
Didier, A., Miller, J. M., & Nuttall, A. L. (1993). The vascular component of sodium salicylate ototoxicity in the guinea pig. Hearing Research, 69(1-2), 199-206.
Didier A, Miller JM, Nuttall AL. The Vascular Component of Sodium Salicylate Ototoxicity in the Guinea Pig. Hear Res. 1993;69(1-2):199-206. PubMed PMID: 8226340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The vascular component of sodium salicylate ototoxicity in the guinea pig. AU - Didier,A, AU - Miller,J M, AU - Nuttall,A L, PY - 1993/9/1/pubmed PY - 1993/9/1/medline PY - 1993/9/1/entrez SP - 199 EP - 206 JF - Hearing research JO - Hear. Res. VL - 69 IS - 1-2 N2 - Drugs of the salicylate family (aspirin-like drugs) are reversibly ototoxic. Electrophysiologic and ultrastructural evidence suggests an impairment of the sensory hair cells of the cochlea following salicylate treatment. In addition, since these drugs can cause vasoconstriction, the ototoxicity of salicylates may also involve an impairment of the blood circulation in inner ear. However, a vascular hypothesis of salicylate toxicity has not received much attention. In the current study, we simultaneously measured cochlear blood flow (by laser Doppler flowmetry) and the sound-evoked potentials from the round window. Sodium salicylate caused a decrease in cochlear blood flow that appeared within 30 min following an intramuscular injection of a low dose of sodium salicylate (100 mg/kg). This sodium salicylate dose did not cause a change in auditory sensitivity. For higher doses (200 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg), both cochlear blood flow and auditory sensitivity were affected. The 300 mg/kg dose decreased blood flow by about 25% and elevated compound action potential thresholds by 10 to 25 dB for high frequencies (> or = 8 kHz). Further experiments showed that salicylate-induced threshold shifts were significantly reduced for the mid-frequencies when cochlear blood flow is increased by the vasodilating drug hydralazine (negating the flow reduction caused by salicylate). These data indicate that in addition to the direct effect of systemically administered salicylate on neurosecretory function a decreased blood flow contributes to the ototoxicity of salicylates. SN - 0378-5955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8226340/The_vascular_component_of_sodium_salicylate_ototoxicity_in_the_guinea_pig_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0378-5955(93)90108-D DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -