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Succimer: the first approved oral lead chelator.
Am Fam Physician. 1993 Dec; 48(8):1496-502.AF

Abstract

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has redefined the threshold of concern for low-level lead toxicity, reducing it from a blood lead level of 25 micrograms per dL (1.21 mumol per L) to a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dL (0.48 mumol per L), and has recommended universal screening of young children. Succimer (2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) is an effective oral lead chelating agent that has been approved for outpatient treatment of children with blood lead levels higher than 45 micrograms per dL (2.17 mumol per L). In the United States, clinical experience with succimer is limited; however, observed side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms, rash and transient elevations of serum aminotransferase levels, are uncommon and mild. Isolated cases of neutropenia have been reported. Weekly monitoring of complete blood counts and serum aminotransferase levels is recommended during the 19-day treatment. Blood lead levels should be checked weekly to identify rebound from bone and soft tissue mobilization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fairview General Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8249780

Citation

Jorgensen, F M.. "Succimer: the First Approved Oral Lead Chelator." American Family Physician, vol. 48, no. 8, 1993, pp. 1496-502.
Jorgensen FM. Succimer: the first approved oral lead chelator. Am Fam Physician. 1993;48(8):1496-502.
Jorgensen, F. M. (1993). Succimer: the first approved oral lead chelator. American Family Physician, 48(8), 1496-502.
Jorgensen FM. Succimer: the First Approved Oral Lead Chelator. Am Fam Physician. 1993;48(8):1496-502. PubMed PMID: 8249780.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Succimer: the first approved oral lead chelator. A1 - Jorgensen,F M, PY - 1993/12/1/pubmed PY - 1993/12/1/medline PY - 1993/12/1/entrez SP - 1496 EP - 502 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 48 IS - 8 N2 - The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has redefined the threshold of concern for low-level lead toxicity, reducing it from a blood lead level of 25 micrograms per dL (1.21 mumol per L) to a blood lead level of 10 micrograms per dL (0.48 mumol per L), and has recommended universal screening of young children. Succimer (2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid) is an effective oral lead chelating agent that has been approved for outpatient treatment of children with blood lead levels higher than 45 micrograms per dL (2.17 mumol per L). In the United States, clinical experience with succimer is limited; however, observed side effects, including gastrointestinal symptoms, rash and transient elevations of serum aminotransferase levels, are uncommon and mild. Isolated cases of neutropenia have been reported. Weekly monitoring of complete blood counts and serum aminotransferase levels is recommended during the 19-day treatment. Blood lead levels should be checked weekly to identify rebound from bone and soft tissue mobilization. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8249780/Succimer:_the_first_approved_oral_lead_chelator_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/leadpoisoning.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -