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Enrichment programs to create a pipeline to biomedical science careers.
J Assoc Acad Minor Phys. 1993; 4(4):127-31.JA

Abstract

The Student Educational Enrichment Programs at the Medical College of Georgia in the School of Medicine were created to increase underrepresented minorities in the pipeline to biomedical science careers. Eight-week summer programs are conducted for high school, research apprentice, and intermediate and advanced college students. There is a prematriculation program for accepted medical, dental, and graduate students. Between 1979 and 1990, 245 high school students attended 12 summer programs. Of these, 240 (98%) entered college 1 year later. In 1986, after eight programs, 162 (68%) high school participants graduated from college with a baccalaureate degree, and 127 responded to a follow-up survey. Sixty-two (49%) of the college graduates attended health science schools, and 23 (18%) of these matriculated to medical school. Of college students, 504 participated in 13 summer programs. Four hundred (79%) of these students responded to a questionnaire, which indicated that 348 (87%) of the 400 entered health science occupations and/or professional schools; 179 (45%) of these students matriculated to medical school. Minority students participating in enrichment programs have greater success in gaining acceptance to college and professional school. These data suggest that early enrichment initiatives increase the number of underrepresented minorities in the biomedical science pipeline.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine, Augusta 30912-1900.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8251707

Citation

Cregler, L L.. "Enrichment Programs to Create a Pipeline to Biomedical Science Careers." Journal of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians : the Official Publication of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians, vol. 4, no. 4, 1993, pp. 127-31.
Cregler LL. Enrichment programs to create a pipeline to biomedical science careers. J Assoc Acad Minor Phys. 1993;4(4):127-31.
Cregler, L. L. (1993). Enrichment programs to create a pipeline to biomedical science careers. Journal of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians : the Official Publication of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians, 4(4), 127-31.
Cregler LL. Enrichment Programs to Create a Pipeline to Biomedical Science Careers. J Assoc Acad Minor Phys. 1993;4(4):127-31. PubMed PMID: 8251707.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Enrichment programs to create a pipeline to biomedical science careers. A1 - Cregler,L L, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez SP - 127 EP - 31 JF - Journal of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians : the official publication of the Association for Academic Minority Physicians JO - J Assoc Acad Minor Phys VL - 4 IS - 4 N2 - The Student Educational Enrichment Programs at the Medical College of Georgia in the School of Medicine were created to increase underrepresented minorities in the pipeline to biomedical science careers. Eight-week summer programs are conducted for high school, research apprentice, and intermediate and advanced college students. There is a prematriculation program for accepted medical, dental, and graduate students. Between 1979 and 1990, 245 high school students attended 12 summer programs. Of these, 240 (98%) entered college 1 year later. In 1986, after eight programs, 162 (68%) high school participants graduated from college with a baccalaureate degree, and 127 responded to a follow-up survey. Sixty-two (49%) of the college graduates attended health science schools, and 23 (18%) of these matriculated to medical school. Of college students, 504 participated in 13 summer programs. Four hundred (79%) of these students responded to a questionnaire, which indicated that 348 (87%) of the 400 entered health science occupations and/or professional schools; 179 (45%) of these students matriculated to medical school. Minority students participating in enrichment programs have greater success in gaining acceptance to college and professional school. These data suggest that early enrichment initiatives increase the number of underrepresented minorities in the biomedical science pipeline. SN - 1048-9886 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8251707/Enrichment_programs_to_create_a_pipeline_to_biomedical_science_careers_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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