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Depressed ventilatory load compensation in sleep apnea. Reversal by nasal CPAP.
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993 Dec; 148(6 Pt 1):1610-5.AR

Abstract

Abnormal inspiratory load compensation may be one factor leading to development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Alternatively, abnormalities in ventilatory load compensation may be a consequence of the manifestations of OSA. This investigation was designed to determine if impairment of awake inspiratory load compensation exists in OSA and to determine if abnormalities in this parameter are reversible by nasal CPAP therapy. A new technique for assessment of awake inspiratory load compensation was devised to standardize the degree of ventilatory stimulation applied during load compensation assessment in each subject. This eliminates intersubject differences in degree of ventilatory stimulation during testing, which are inevitable with standard techniques and which have been shown to affect the measurement of load compensation. Inspiratory load compensation was assessed during resting room air ventilation and during steady state CO2 and exercise stimulation titrated to provide similar degrees of ventilatory stimulation in each subject. Impairment of awake inspiratory load compensation was found during all conditions in the patients with moderate to severe OSA studied compared with that in weight-matched control subjects. Normalization of awake inspiratory load compensation was observed after 4 wk of nasal CPAP therapy in five patients. These results indicate that impairment of awake inspiratory load compensation is a reversible consequence rather than a cause of OSA.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sleep Wake Disorders Center, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New Hyde Park, New York.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8256910

Citation

Greenberg, H E., and S M. Scharf. "Depressed Ventilatory Load Compensation in Sleep Apnea. Reversal By Nasal CPAP." The American Review of Respiratory Disease, vol. 148, no. 6 Pt 1, 1993, pp. 1610-5.
Greenberg HE, Scharf SM. Depressed ventilatory load compensation in sleep apnea. Reversal by nasal CPAP. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993;148(6 Pt 1):1610-5.
Greenberg, H. E., & Scharf, S. M. (1993). Depressed ventilatory load compensation in sleep apnea. Reversal by nasal CPAP. The American Review of Respiratory Disease, 148(6 Pt 1), 1610-5.
Greenberg HE, Scharf SM. Depressed Ventilatory Load Compensation in Sleep Apnea. Reversal By Nasal CPAP. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1993;148(6 Pt 1):1610-5. PubMed PMID: 8256910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depressed ventilatory load compensation in sleep apnea. Reversal by nasal CPAP. AU - Greenberg,H E, AU - Scharf,S M, PY - 1993/12/1/pubmed PY - 1993/12/1/medline PY - 1993/12/1/entrez SP - 1610 EP - 5 JF - The American review of respiratory disease JO - Am Rev Respir Dis VL - 148 IS - 6 Pt 1 N2 - Abnormal inspiratory load compensation may be one factor leading to development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Alternatively, abnormalities in ventilatory load compensation may be a consequence of the manifestations of OSA. This investigation was designed to determine if impairment of awake inspiratory load compensation exists in OSA and to determine if abnormalities in this parameter are reversible by nasal CPAP therapy. A new technique for assessment of awake inspiratory load compensation was devised to standardize the degree of ventilatory stimulation applied during load compensation assessment in each subject. This eliminates intersubject differences in degree of ventilatory stimulation during testing, which are inevitable with standard techniques and which have been shown to affect the measurement of load compensation. Inspiratory load compensation was assessed during resting room air ventilation and during steady state CO2 and exercise stimulation titrated to provide similar degrees of ventilatory stimulation in each subject. Impairment of awake inspiratory load compensation was found during all conditions in the patients with moderate to severe OSA studied compared with that in weight-matched control subjects. Normalization of awake inspiratory load compensation was observed after 4 wk of nasal CPAP therapy in five patients. These results indicate that impairment of awake inspiratory load compensation is a reversible consequence rather than a cause of OSA. SN - 0003-0805 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8256910/Depressed_ventilatory_load_compensation_in_sleep_apnea._Reversal_by_nasal_CPAP. L2 - https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/10.1164/ajrccm/148.6_Pt_1.1610?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -