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Urban epizootic of rabies in Mexico: epidemiology and impact of animal bite injuries.
Bull World Health Organ. 1993; 71(5):615-24.BW

Abstract

From 1 July 1987 to 31 December 1988, a total of 317 animals (91% of which were dogs) were confirmed to have rabies in Hermosillo, Mexico. The median age of rabid dogs was 1 year, 69% were male, and 98% were owned. The epizootic started in the southern areas of the city, rapidly involved the entire city, and persisted mainly in lower socioeconomic status areas. The area of the city and mean household size were significant predictor variables for the population density of rabid dogs around household clusters (Poisson linear regression, P < 0.001 and P = 0.03, resp). Approximately 2.5% of city residents were bitten by dogs in 1987, with the rate of reported dog bite injuries being positively correlated with mean household size and the proportion of households that owned dogs. Visits to the city health centre for evaluation of possible exposures to rabies increased by 135% after the start of the epizootic; approximately 273 per 100,000 city residents were administered a full or partial course of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis in 1987. Children were at greatest risk for exposures to rabies, accounting for 60% of all reported animal bite injuries evaluated at the health centre. Also they were more likely than older persons to have received bite injuries to the head, face, and neck (odds ratio = 21.6, 95% confidence interval = 5.4, 186.5).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8261565

Citation

Eng, T R., et al. "Urban Epizootic of Rabies in Mexico: Epidemiology and Impact of Animal Bite Injuries." Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 71, no. 5, 1993, pp. 615-24.
Eng TR, Fishbein DB, Talamante HE, et al. Urban epizootic of rabies in Mexico: epidemiology and impact of animal bite injuries. Bull World Health Organ. 1993;71(5):615-24.
Eng, T. R., Fishbein, D. B., Talamante, H. E., Hall, D. B., Chavez, G. F., Dobbins, J. G., Muro, F. J., Bustos, J. L., de los Angeles Ricardy, M., & Munguia, A. (1993). Urban epizootic of rabies in Mexico: epidemiology and impact of animal bite injuries. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 71(5), 615-24.
Eng TR, et al. Urban Epizootic of Rabies in Mexico: Epidemiology and Impact of Animal Bite Injuries. Bull World Health Organ. 1993;71(5):615-24. PubMed PMID: 8261565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urban epizootic of rabies in Mexico: epidemiology and impact of animal bite injuries. A1 - Eng,T R, AU - Fishbein,D B, AU - Talamante,H E, AU - Hall,D B, AU - Chavez,G F, AU - Dobbins,J G, AU - Muro,F J, AU - Bustos,J L, AU - de los Angeles Ricardy,M, AU - Munguia,A, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez KW - Americas KW - Central America KW - Data Analysis KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Epidemics KW - Epidemiologic Methods KW - Infections KW - Information KW - Information Processing KW - Latin America KW - Mexico KW - North America KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Records KW - Research Methodology KW - Research Report KW - Sampling Studies KW - Statistical Regression KW - Statistical Studies KW - Studies KW - Surveys KW - Urban Population KW - Viral Diseases SP - 615 EP - 24 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull World Health Organ VL - 71 IS - 5 N2 - From 1 July 1987 to 31 December 1988, a total of 317 animals (91% of which were dogs) were confirmed to have rabies in Hermosillo, Mexico. The median age of rabid dogs was 1 year, 69% were male, and 98% were owned. The epizootic started in the southern areas of the city, rapidly involved the entire city, and persisted mainly in lower socioeconomic status areas. The area of the city and mean household size were significant predictor variables for the population density of rabid dogs around household clusters (Poisson linear regression, P < 0.001 and P = 0.03, resp). Approximately 2.5% of city residents were bitten by dogs in 1987, with the rate of reported dog bite injuries being positively correlated with mean household size and the proportion of households that owned dogs. Visits to the city health centre for evaluation of possible exposures to rabies increased by 135% after the start of the epizootic; approximately 273 per 100,000 city residents were administered a full or partial course of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis in 1987. Children were at greatest risk for exposures to rabies, accounting for 60% of all reported animal bite injuries evaluated at the health centre. Also they were more likely than older persons to have received bite injuries to the head, face, and neck (odds ratio = 21.6, 95% confidence interval = 5.4, 186.5). SN - 0042-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8261565/Urban_epizootic_of_rabies_in_Mexico:_epidemiology_and_impact_of_animal_bite_injuries_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/8261565/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -