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Dietary intake as a risk factor for cancer of the exocrine pancreas.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1993 Nov-Dec; 2(6):513-8CE

Abstract

Data from 149 cases with pancreatic cancer and 363 control subjects in Utah were obtained from proxy respondents to assess the associations between dietary intake and the development of pancreatic cancer. After adjusting for cigarette smoking status and alcohol and coffee consumption, we observed that foods containing large amounts of fat from all sources increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men [odds ratio (OR), 3.41; 95% CI, 1.59-7.29]. Further division of fat by source of food showed that high intake of bacon and sausages (OR for upper tertile, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.34-5.72) as well as large intakes of fatty foods other than meat or dairy products (OR for upper tertile, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.33-5.89) increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men; high levels of intake of red meat, chicken, fish, and dairy foods did not increase risk of pancreatic cancer in either men or women. In women, fat from nonmeat and nondairy sources also increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR for upper tertile, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.35-8.78). Although no protective effect was observed among men who consumed large amounts of fruits, vegetables, or high fiber foods, we did observe a protective effect in women for these foods (OR for upper tertile of fruit consumption, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18-0.81; OR for upper tertile of vegetable consumption, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.13-0.74; and OR for upper tertile of fiber consumption, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.12-0.67). Findings from this study support the hypothesis that diets high in fat contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8268766

Citation

Lyon, J L., et al. "Dietary Intake as a Risk Factor for Cancer of the Exocrine Pancreas." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 2, no. 6, 1993, pp. 513-8.
Lyon JL, Slattery ML, Mahoney AW, et al. Dietary intake as a risk factor for cancer of the exocrine pancreas. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993;2(6):513-8.
Lyon, J. L., Slattery, M. L., Mahoney, A. W., & Robison, L. M. (1993). Dietary intake as a risk factor for cancer of the exocrine pancreas. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 2(6), pp. 513-8.
Lyon JL, et al. Dietary Intake as a Risk Factor for Cancer of the Exocrine Pancreas. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1993;2(6):513-8. PubMed PMID: 8268766.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake as a risk factor for cancer of the exocrine pancreas. AU - Lyon,J L, AU - Slattery,M L, AU - Mahoney,A W, AU - Robison,L M, PY - 1993/11/1/pubmed PY - 1993/11/1/medline PY - 1993/11/1/entrez SP - 513 EP - 8 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 2 IS - 6 N2 - Data from 149 cases with pancreatic cancer and 363 control subjects in Utah were obtained from proxy respondents to assess the associations between dietary intake and the development of pancreatic cancer. After adjusting for cigarette smoking status and alcohol and coffee consumption, we observed that foods containing large amounts of fat from all sources increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men [odds ratio (OR), 3.41; 95% CI, 1.59-7.29]. Further division of fat by source of food showed that high intake of bacon and sausages (OR for upper tertile, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.34-5.72) as well as large intakes of fatty foods other than meat or dairy products (OR for upper tertile, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.33-5.89) increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men; high levels of intake of red meat, chicken, fish, and dairy foods did not increase risk of pancreatic cancer in either men or women. In women, fat from nonmeat and nondairy sources also increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR for upper tertile, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.35-8.78). Although no protective effect was observed among men who consumed large amounts of fruits, vegetables, or high fiber foods, we did observe a protective effect in women for these foods (OR for upper tertile of fruit consumption, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.18-0.81; OR for upper tertile of vegetable consumption, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.13-0.74; and OR for upper tertile of fiber consumption, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.12-0.67). Findings from this study support the hypothesis that diets high in fat contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8268766/Dietary_intake_as_a_risk_factor_for_cancer_of_the_exocrine_pancreas_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=8268766 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -