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The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody test in celiac disease in children: a prospective study.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1993 Oct; 17(3):260-4.JP

Abstract

Serum gliadin antibodies (IgA/IgG) were determined in 191 consecutive children (median age, 2.75 years; range, 0.33-15.5 years) admitted for a small-intestinal biopsy on suspicion of celiac disease. The test was a diffusion-in-gel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DIG-ELISA). Of these 191, 14 (7.3%) appeared to have untreated celiac disease. Depending on the choice of cut-off value of the test (combined determination of IgA and IgG), the sensitivity was 86-100%, the specificity was 97-99%, and the positive/negative predictive values were 70-92% and 99-100%, respectively. No variation according to age was found. Gliadin antibodies were determined in 47 children who had well-treated celiac disease. Fourteen of these children were also investigated when challenged with gluten. Gliadin antibodies (IgA or IgG) decreased significantly in 13 of 13 cases when the patients shifted from a gluten-containing diet to a gluten-free one. During the gluten challenge, the IgG and IgA increased in 14 of 14 and 11 of 14 cases, respectively (two patients suffered from IgA deficiency). In eight patients who later appeared to be free of celiac disease, the gliadin antibodies were determined on gluten-free diet and during gluten challenge; no significant differences in gliadin antibodies were found. We conclude that this test is useful in selecting patients with symptoms suggesting celiac disease for a small-intestinal biopsy. The test seems to be of some value in monitoring the effects of a gluten-free diet and during gluten challenge.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8271124

Citation

Bodé, S, et al. "The Diagnostic Value of the Gliadin Antibody Test in Celiac Disease in Children: a Prospective Study." Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 3, 1993, pp. 260-4.
Bodé S, Weile B, Krasilnikoff PA, et al. The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody test in celiac disease in children: a prospective study. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1993;17(3):260-4.
Bodé, S., Weile, B., Krasilnikoff, P. A., & Gudmand-Høyer, E. (1993). The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody test in celiac disease in children: a prospective study. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 17(3), 260-4.
Bodé S, et al. The Diagnostic Value of the Gliadin Antibody Test in Celiac Disease in Children: a Prospective Study. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 1993;17(3):260-4. PubMed PMID: 8271124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The diagnostic value of the gliadin antibody test in celiac disease in children: a prospective study. AU - Bodé,S, AU - Weile,B, AU - Krasilnikoff,P A, AU - Gudmand-Høyer,E, PY - 1993/10/1/pubmed PY - 1993/10/1/medline PY - 1993/10/1/entrez SP - 260 EP - 4 JF - Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition JO - J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - Serum gliadin antibodies (IgA/IgG) were determined in 191 consecutive children (median age, 2.75 years; range, 0.33-15.5 years) admitted for a small-intestinal biopsy on suspicion of celiac disease. The test was a diffusion-in-gel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DIG-ELISA). Of these 191, 14 (7.3%) appeared to have untreated celiac disease. Depending on the choice of cut-off value of the test (combined determination of IgA and IgG), the sensitivity was 86-100%, the specificity was 97-99%, and the positive/negative predictive values were 70-92% and 99-100%, respectively. No variation according to age was found. Gliadin antibodies were determined in 47 children who had well-treated celiac disease. Fourteen of these children were also investigated when challenged with gluten. Gliadin antibodies (IgA or IgG) decreased significantly in 13 of 13 cases when the patients shifted from a gluten-containing diet to a gluten-free one. During the gluten challenge, the IgG and IgA increased in 14 of 14 and 11 of 14 cases, respectively (two patients suffered from IgA deficiency). In eight patients who later appeared to be free of celiac disease, the gliadin antibodies were determined on gluten-free diet and during gluten challenge; no significant differences in gliadin antibodies were found. We conclude that this test is useful in selecting patients with symptoms suggesting celiac disease for a small-intestinal biopsy. The test seems to be of some value in monitoring the effects of a gluten-free diet and during gluten challenge. SN - 0277-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8271124/The_diagnostic_value_of_the_gliadin_antibody_test_in_celiac_disease_in_children:_a_prospective_study_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=8271124.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -