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Alcohol consumption and alcoholic liver disease: evidence of a threshold level of effects of ethanol.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1993 Oct; 17(5):1112-7.AC

Abstract

The effects of long-term moderate or "social" alcohol consumption (10-80 g daily intake) on the incidence of features of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were delineated in a consecutive autopsy series of 210 males. The subjects' daily intake, as well as duration of alcohol consumption, was determined by an interview with the spouse or a close acquaintance and compared with semiquantitative histological scores for stage of ALD. No significant increase in the incidence of features of ALD could be related to all-year daily intake of ethanol below 40 g (40 g equals 1.1 liter of beer, 0.44 liter of wine, and 0.11 liter of spirits). However, daily intake between 40-80 g increased relative liver weight on average 3.1 g/kg of body weight (p < 0.02), the frequency of fatty liver from 11.7 to 47.2% [relative risk (RR) = 4.4], and the frequency of mainly slight alcoholic hepatitis up to 16.7% (RR = 7.5). The incidence of both bridging fibrosis and liver cirrhosis increased significantly (RR = 8.8) only when daily intake exceeded 80 g. Amounts of ethanol exceeding 80 g did not relate to further increases in incidence of bridging fibrosis or liver cirrhosis. These findings suggest that, in males, daily ingestion of ethanol below 40 g for a period of 25 years does not increase the risk of alcohol-related liver disease.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Forensic Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8279675

Citation

Savolainen, V T., et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Evidence of a Threshold Level of Effects of Ethanol." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 17, no. 5, 1993, pp. 1112-7.
Savolainen VT, Liesto K, Männikkö A, et al. Alcohol consumption and alcoholic liver disease: evidence of a threshold level of effects of ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1993;17(5):1112-7.
Savolainen, V. T., Liesto, K., Männikkö, A., Penttilä, A., & Karhunen, P. J. (1993). Alcohol consumption and alcoholic liver disease: evidence of a threshold level of effects of ethanol. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 17(5), 1112-7.
Savolainen VT, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Alcoholic Liver Disease: Evidence of a Threshold Level of Effects of Ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1993;17(5):1112-7. PubMed PMID: 8279675.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and alcoholic liver disease: evidence of a threshold level of effects of ethanol. AU - Savolainen,V T, AU - Liesto,K, AU - Männikkö,A, AU - Penttilä,A, AU - Karhunen,P J, PY - 1993/10/1/pubmed PY - 1993/10/1/medline PY - 1993/10/1/entrez SP - 1112 EP - 7 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 17 IS - 5 N2 - The effects of long-term moderate or "social" alcohol consumption (10-80 g daily intake) on the incidence of features of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) were delineated in a consecutive autopsy series of 210 males. The subjects' daily intake, as well as duration of alcohol consumption, was determined by an interview with the spouse or a close acquaintance and compared with semiquantitative histological scores for stage of ALD. No significant increase in the incidence of features of ALD could be related to all-year daily intake of ethanol below 40 g (40 g equals 1.1 liter of beer, 0.44 liter of wine, and 0.11 liter of spirits). However, daily intake between 40-80 g increased relative liver weight on average 3.1 g/kg of body weight (p < 0.02), the frequency of fatty liver from 11.7 to 47.2% [relative risk (RR) = 4.4], and the frequency of mainly slight alcoholic hepatitis up to 16.7% (RR = 7.5). The incidence of both bridging fibrosis and liver cirrhosis increased significantly (RR = 8.8) only when daily intake exceeded 80 g. Amounts of ethanol exceeding 80 g did not relate to further increases in incidence of bridging fibrosis or liver cirrhosis. These findings suggest that, in males, daily ingestion of ethanol below 40 g for a period of 25 years does not increase the risk of alcohol-related liver disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8279675/Alcohol_consumption_and_alcoholic_liver_disease:_evidence_of_a_threshold_level_of_effects_of_ethanol_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0145-6008&amp;date=1993&amp;volume=17&amp;issue=5&amp;spage=1112 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -