Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A study into the phenomenon of head-shaking nystagmus: its presence in a dizzy population.
J Otolaryngol. 1993 Oct; 22(5):376-9.JO

Abstract

In this paper we have prospectively analyzed results from approximately 1,500 patients who underwent a head-shaking test during routine electronystagmography (ENG). The incidence of head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) in a dizzy population was relatively high (31.7%) when compared to other so-called abnormalities in the routine ENG test battery. Its presence was also similar in both active vs. passive head-shake tests. When present, different types of HSN were identified (monophasic (76.8%), biphasic (22.7%) and triphasic (0.5%)). In some cases, reversals of the expected "normal" pattern occurred. A high correlation was found to exist between a positive head-shake test and the presence of spontaneous nystagmus, positional nystagmus and caloric test abnormalities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, Okayama University Medical School.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8283508

Citation

Fujimoto, M, et al. "A Study Into the Phenomenon of Head-shaking Nystagmus: Its Presence in a Dizzy Population." The Journal of Otolaryngology, vol. 22, no. 5, 1993, pp. 376-9.
Fujimoto M, Rutka J, Mai M. A study into the phenomenon of head-shaking nystagmus: its presence in a dizzy population. J Otolaryngol. 1993;22(5):376-9.
Fujimoto, M., Rutka, J., & Mai, M. (1993). A study into the phenomenon of head-shaking nystagmus: its presence in a dizzy population. The Journal of Otolaryngology, 22(5), 376-9.
Fujimoto M, Rutka J, Mai M. A Study Into the Phenomenon of Head-shaking Nystagmus: Its Presence in a Dizzy Population. J Otolaryngol. 1993;22(5):376-9. PubMed PMID: 8283508.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A study into the phenomenon of head-shaking nystagmus: its presence in a dizzy population. AU - Fujimoto,M, AU - Rutka,J, AU - Mai,M, PY - 1993/10/1/pubmed PY - 1993/10/1/medline PY - 1993/10/1/entrez SP - 376 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of otolaryngology JO - J Otolaryngol VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - In this paper we have prospectively analyzed results from approximately 1,500 patients who underwent a head-shaking test during routine electronystagmography (ENG). The incidence of head-shaking nystagmus (HSN) in a dizzy population was relatively high (31.7%) when compared to other so-called abnormalities in the routine ENG test battery. Its presence was also similar in both active vs. passive head-shake tests. When present, different types of HSN were identified (monophasic (76.8%), biphasic (22.7%) and triphasic (0.5%)). In some cases, reversals of the expected "normal" pattern occurred. A high correlation was found to exist between a positive head-shake test and the presence of spontaneous nystagmus, positional nystagmus and caloric test abnormalities. SN - 0381-6605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8283508/A_study_into_the_phenomenon_of_head_shaking_nystagmus:_its_presence_in_a_dizzy_population_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dizzinessandvertigo.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -