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Analysis of the influenza virus gene pool of avian species from southern China.
Virology 1994; 198(2):557-66V

Abstract

Although Southern China has been considered the epicenter of human influenza pandemics, little is known about the genetic composition of influenza viruses in lower mammals or birds in that region. To provide information on the molecular epidemiology of these viruses, we used dot blot hybridization and phylogenetic methods to study the internal genes (PB1, PB2, PA, NP, M, and NS) of 106 avian influenza A viruses isolated from a total of 11,798 domestic ducks, chickens, and geese raised in Southern China including Hong Kong. All 636 genes examined were characteristic of avian influenza viruses; no human or swine influenza genes were detected. Thus, influenza virus reassortants do not appear to be maintained in the domesticated birds of Southeast Asia, eliminating opportunities for further gene reassortment. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the internal genes of these viruses belong to the Eurasian avian lineage, supporting geographical separation of the major avian lineages. The PB1 genes were most similar to A/Singapore/57 (H2N2) and Hong Kong (H3N2) viral genes, supporting an avian origin for the recent human H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic strains. The majority of internal genes from avian influenza viruses in Southern China belong to the Eurasian lineage and are similar to viruses that have recently been transmitted to humans, swine, and horses. This study provides evidence that the transmission of avian influenza viruses and their genes to other species is unidirectional and that the transmission of mammalian influenza virus strains to domestic poultry is probably not a factor in the generation of new pandemic strains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Virology/Molecular Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38101.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8291238

Citation

Lin, Y P., et al. "Analysis of the Influenza Virus Gene Pool of Avian Species From Southern China." Virology, vol. 198, no. 2, 1994, pp. 557-66.
Lin YP, Shu LL, Wright S, et al. Analysis of the influenza virus gene pool of avian species from southern China. Virology. 1994;198(2):557-66.
Lin, Y. P., Shu, L. L., Wright, S., Bean, W. J., Sharp, G. B., Shortridge, K. F., & Webster, R. G. (1994). Analysis of the influenza virus gene pool of avian species from southern China. Virology, 198(2), pp. 557-66.
Lin YP, et al. Analysis of the Influenza Virus Gene Pool of Avian Species From Southern China. Virology. 1994;198(2):557-66. PubMed PMID: 8291238.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of the influenza virus gene pool of avian species from southern China. AU - Lin,Y P, AU - Shu,L L, AU - Wright,S, AU - Bean,W J, AU - Sharp,G B, AU - Shortridge,K F, AU - Webster,R G, PY - 1994/2/1/pubmed PY - 1994/2/1/medline PY - 1994/2/1/entrez SP - 557 EP - 66 JF - Virology JO - Virology VL - 198 IS - 2 N2 - Although Southern China has been considered the epicenter of human influenza pandemics, little is known about the genetic composition of influenza viruses in lower mammals or birds in that region. To provide information on the molecular epidemiology of these viruses, we used dot blot hybridization and phylogenetic methods to study the internal genes (PB1, PB2, PA, NP, M, and NS) of 106 avian influenza A viruses isolated from a total of 11,798 domestic ducks, chickens, and geese raised in Southern China including Hong Kong. All 636 genes examined were characteristic of avian influenza viruses; no human or swine influenza genes were detected. Thus, influenza virus reassortants do not appear to be maintained in the domesticated birds of Southeast Asia, eliminating opportunities for further gene reassortment. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the internal genes of these viruses belong to the Eurasian avian lineage, supporting geographical separation of the major avian lineages. The PB1 genes were most similar to A/Singapore/57 (H2N2) and Hong Kong (H3N2) viral genes, supporting an avian origin for the recent human H2N2 and H3N2 pandemic strains. The majority of internal genes from avian influenza viruses in Southern China belong to the Eurasian lineage and are similar to viruses that have recently been transmitted to humans, swine, and horses. This study provides evidence that the transmission of avian influenza viruses and their genes to other species is unidirectional and that the transmission of mammalian influenza virus strains to domestic poultry is probably not a factor in the generation of new pandemic strains. SN - 0042-6822 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8291238/Analysis_of_the_influenza_virus_gene_pool_of_avian_species_from_southern_China_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0042-6822(84)71067-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -