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Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use.
Br Med Bull. 1993 Jan; 49(1):140-57.BM

Abstract

With over 60 million users of 'the pill' worldwide, safety and efficacy remain the two most relevant issues to both the consumer and the research scientist. Safety of combined oral contraception (COC) has advanced appreciably. Lessons learned from cohort and case-control studies have been applied to the practical management of oral contraception use, based on screening, selection and regular monitoring of users. Most health risks of COCs appear to be dependent on the dose and potency (or biological impact) of the constituent steroids. While many of the non-contraceptive benefits of COCs are maintained when modern low dose preparations are used, most, if not all, of the adverse effects have been reduced progressively. Moreover the range of modern hormonal contraceptives has widened with the introduction of a new generation of 'selective' progestogens (Desogestrel, Norgestimate and Gestodene), which have minimal androgenicity. User failure of COCs is still high in many countries. The cause is a combination of poor compliance and anxiety about perceived adverse effects. Compliance can be enhanced by improving the quality of instruction in pill use. Fears of adverse effects of COCs may be allayed through education of users and providers, and sympathetic management of side effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, United Medical and Dental Schools, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8324604

Citation

Kubba, A, and J Guillebaud. "Combined Oral Contraceptives: Acceptability and Effective Use." British Medical Bulletin, vol. 49, no. 1, 1993, pp. 140-57.
Kubba A, Guillebaud J. Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use. Br Med Bull. 1993;49(1):140-57.
Kubba, A., & Guillebaud, J. (1993). Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use. British Medical Bulletin, 49(1), 140-57.
Kubba A, Guillebaud J. Combined Oral Contraceptives: Acceptability and Effective Use. Br Med Bull. 1993;49(1):140-57. PubMed PMID: 8324604.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Combined oral contraceptives: acceptability and effective use. AU - Kubba,A, AU - Guillebaud,J, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez KW - Amenorrhea KW - Biology KW - Carbohydrate Metabolic Effects KW - Contraception KW - Contraceptive Effectiveness KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Contraceptive Methods--contraindications KW - Contraceptive Methods--side effects KW - Diseases KW - Family Planning KW - Lipid Metabolic Effects KW - Lipids KW - Menstruation Disorders KW - Metabolic Effects KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Oral Contraceptives, Combined--contraindications KW - Oral Contraceptives, Combined--side effects KW - Oral Contraceptives, Phasic KW - Oral Contraceptives--contraindications KW - Oral Contraceptives--side effects KW - Physiology KW - Risk Factors KW - Vitamins SP - 140 EP - 57 JF - British medical bulletin JO - Br Med Bull VL - 49 IS - 1 N2 - With over 60 million users of 'the pill' worldwide, safety and efficacy remain the two most relevant issues to both the consumer and the research scientist. Safety of combined oral contraception (COC) has advanced appreciably. Lessons learned from cohort and case-control studies have been applied to the practical management of oral contraception use, based on screening, selection and regular monitoring of users. Most health risks of COCs appear to be dependent on the dose and potency (or biological impact) of the constituent steroids. While many of the non-contraceptive benefits of COCs are maintained when modern low dose preparations are used, most, if not all, of the adverse effects have been reduced progressively. Moreover the range of modern hormonal contraceptives has widened with the introduction of a new generation of 'selective' progestogens (Desogestrel, Norgestimate and Gestodene), which have minimal androgenicity. User failure of COCs is still high in many countries. The cause is a combination of poor compliance and anxiety about perceived adverse effects. Compliance can be enhanced by improving the quality of instruction in pill use. Fears of adverse effects of COCs may be allayed through education of users and providers, and sympathetic management of side effects. SN - 0007-1420 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8324604/Combined_oral_contraceptives:_acceptability_and_effective_use_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/bmb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/oxfordjournals.bmb.a072593 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -