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Two-dose measles vaccination schedules.
Bull World Health Organ. 1993; 71(3-4):421-8.BW

Abstract

As measles continues to exact a high toll on infant mortality, particularly in developing countries, optimal strategies for the control of the disease are under discussion. As part of this debate, the place of 2-dose measles immunization schedules is reviewed regarding their potential as a strategy to improve measles control. To date, WHO has not recommended the use of a 2-dose schedule. A number of industrialized countries have already adopted a 2-dose schedule, often choosing to administer measles vaccine in the same injection as mumps and rubella vaccines. However, at present not enough is known about such schedules in developing countries to make global recommendations. Further research should include randomized controlled trials of early 2-dose schedules to investigate both technical and epidemiological issues such as the effect of blunting immunity and the duration of antibody. Long-term safety should be determined through studies of adequate size. Programmes already using 2-dose schedules are encouraged to evaluate their impact on disease incidence, cost, vaccine usage, and effect on coverage. Until further evaluation is complete, a high and timely coverage with one dose of measles vaccine in all areas remains the first priority for all immunization programmes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health and Child Survival Fellow assigned to the Expanded Programme on Immunization, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8324862

Citation

Rosenthal, S R., and C J. Clements. "Two-dose Measles Vaccination Schedules." Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 71, no. 3-4, 1993, pp. 421-8.
Rosenthal SR, Clements CJ. Two-dose measles vaccination schedules. Bull World Health Organ. 1993;71(3-4):421-8.
Rosenthal, S. R., & Clements, C. J. (1993). Two-dose measles vaccination schedules. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 71(3-4), 421-8.
Rosenthal SR, Clements CJ. Two-dose Measles Vaccination Schedules. Bull World Health Organ. 1993;71(3-4):421-8. PubMed PMID: 8324862.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Two-dose measles vaccination schedules. AU - Rosenthal,S R, AU - Clements,C J, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez KW - Age Factors KW - Case Control Studies KW - Child KW - Clinical Research KW - Clinical Trials KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Health KW - Health Services KW - Immunization KW - Infant KW - International Agencies KW - Logistics KW - Management KW - Mathematical Model KW - Measles--prevention and control KW - Models, Theoretical KW - Organization And Administration KW - Organizations KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Primary Health Care KW - Research Activities KW - Research Methodology KW - Studies KW - Un KW - Vaccination KW - Viral Diseases KW - Who KW - Youth SP - 421 EP - 8 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull World Health Organ VL - 71 IS - 3-4 N2 - As measles continues to exact a high toll on infant mortality, particularly in developing countries, optimal strategies for the control of the disease are under discussion. As part of this debate, the place of 2-dose measles immunization schedules is reviewed regarding their potential as a strategy to improve measles control. To date, WHO has not recommended the use of a 2-dose schedule. A number of industrialized countries have already adopted a 2-dose schedule, often choosing to administer measles vaccine in the same injection as mumps and rubella vaccines. However, at present not enough is known about such schedules in developing countries to make global recommendations. Further research should include randomized controlled trials of early 2-dose schedules to investigate both technical and epidemiological issues such as the effect of blunting immunity and the duration of antibody. Long-term safety should be determined through studies of adequate size. Programmes already using 2-dose schedules are encouraged to evaluate their impact on disease incidence, cost, vaccine usage, and effect on coverage. Until further evaluation is complete, a high and timely coverage with one dose of measles vaccine in all areas remains the first priority for all immunization programmes. SN - 0042-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8324862/Two_dose_measles_vaccination_schedules_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/8324862/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -