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Breakfast consumption affects adequacy of total daily intake in children.
J Am Diet Assoc. 1993 Aug; 93(8):886-91.JA

Abstract

Breakfast consumption patterns were assessed for 467 10-year-old children (59% white, 50% girls), who were interviewed in 1984-1985 or in 1987-1988. Consumption patterns were then related to mean daily nutrient intake patterns. More whites (56%) and more girls (46%) ate breakfast at home, whereas more blacks (58%) and more boys (49%) ate breakfast at school. Results indicated that 16% of all children skipped breakfast; the highest percentage was in black girls (24%). Breakfast consumption made a significant contribution to the child's mean daily nutrient intake. The average total energy intake was significantly lower for children who did not consume breakfast (mean = 1,821 kcal) and for children who consumed breakfast at home (mean = 2,098 kcal) compared with children who consumed breakfast at school (mean = 2,326 kcal). A similar pattern was noted for macronutrient contribution. Percentage of total energy from fat was lower in children who did not eat breakfast (34%) compared with those who did (37% to 39%), yet percentage of energy from carbohydrate was higher (53%) in children who did not eat breakfast. Children who skipped breakfast did not make up the differences in dietary intakes at other meals. A higher percentage of children who did not consume breakfast compared with those who ate breakfast did not meet two thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowance for vitamins and minerals. These data confirm the importance of breakfast to overall dietary quality and adequacy in school-age children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Applied Health Sciences, Tulane University Medical Center, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112-2824.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8335868

Citation

Nicklas, T A., et al. "Breakfast Consumption Affects Adequacy of Total Daily Intake in Children." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 93, no. 8, 1993, pp. 886-91.
Nicklas TA, Bao W, Webber LS, et al. Breakfast consumption affects adequacy of total daily intake in children. J Am Diet Assoc. 1993;93(8):886-91.
Nicklas, T. A., Bao, W., Webber, L. S., & Berenson, G. S. (1993). Breakfast consumption affects adequacy of total daily intake in children. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 93(8), 886-91.
Nicklas TA, et al. Breakfast Consumption Affects Adequacy of Total Daily Intake in Children. J Am Diet Assoc. 1993;93(8):886-91. PubMed PMID: 8335868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breakfast consumption affects adequacy of total daily intake in children. AU - Nicklas,T A, AU - Bao,W, AU - Webber,L S, AU - Berenson,G S, PY - 1993/8/1/pubmed PY - 1993/8/1/medline PY - 1993/8/1/entrez SP - 886 EP - 91 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 93 IS - 8 N2 - Breakfast consumption patterns were assessed for 467 10-year-old children (59% white, 50% girls), who were interviewed in 1984-1985 or in 1987-1988. Consumption patterns were then related to mean daily nutrient intake patterns. More whites (56%) and more girls (46%) ate breakfast at home, whereas more blacks (58%) and more boys (49%) ate breakfast at school. Results indicated that 16% of all children skipped breakfast; the highest percentage was in black girls (24%). Breakfast consumption made a significant contribution to the child's mean daily nutrient intake. The average total energy intake was significantly lower for children who did not consume breakfast (mean = 1,821 kcal) and for children who consumed breakfast at home (mean = 2,098 kcal) compared with children who consumed breakfast at school (mean = 2,326 kcal). A similar pattern was noted for macronutrient contribution. Percentage of total energy from fat was lower in children who did not eat breakfast (34%) compared with those who did (37% to 39%), yet percentage of energy from carbohydrate was higher (53%) in children who did not eat breakfast. Children who skipped breakfast did not make up the differences in dietary intakes at other meals. A higher percentage of children who did not consume breakfast compared with those who ate breakfast did not meet two thirds of the Recommended Dietary Allowance for vitamins and minerals. These data confirm the importance of breakfast to overall dietary quality and adequacy in school-age children. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8335868/Breakfast_consumption_affects_adequacy_of_total_daily_intake_in_children_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/0002-8223(93)91527-W DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -