Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dissipation of claudication pain after walking: implications for endurance training.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993 Aug; 25(8):904-10.MS

Abstract

Although onset and maximal claudication pain are attained sooner as exercise intensity is increased, it is unclear whether dissipation of pain during recovery is altered. Thus, this study examined whether walking at gradually higher intensity would prolong the time needed for claudication pain to dissipate during recovery. Thirty patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who were limited by claudication pain performed repeated progressive treadmill tests to assess walking capacity. Thereafter, each patient performed five treadmill tests at grades relative to their walking capacity (i.e., -4%, -2%, 0%, +2%, and +4% of the final grade attained with the progressive protocol). As expected, a curvilinear decrease in time to onset of claudication pain (191.1, 172.8, 132.8, 113.5, and 112.0 s; P < 0.05) and time to maximal claudication pain (394.2, 358.3, 260.5, 218.1, and 200.3 s; P < 0.05) were obtained with progressively higher grades. However, time needed for claudication pain to dissipate during supine recovery remained unchanged with increased walking intensity (358.5, 339.3, 359.9, 398.2, and 390.5 s; P = NS). In conclusion, when PAD patients walk to maximal claudication pain, dissipation of pain during recovery is similar whether the preceding exercise is performed at relatively low or high intensities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Vermont, Burlington 05405.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8371650

Citation

Gardner, A W.. "Dissipation of Claudication Pain After Walking: Implications for Endurance Training." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 25, no. 8, 1993, pp. 904-10.
Gardner AW. Dissipation of claudication pain after walking: implications for endurance training. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993;25(8):904-10.
Gardner, A. W. (1993). Dissipation of claudication pain after walking: implications for endurance training. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 25(8), 904-10.
Gardner AW. Dissipation of Claudication Pain After Walking: Implications for Endurance Training. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1993;25(8):904-10. PubMed PMID: 8371650.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dissipation of claudication pain after walking: implications for endurance training. A1 - Gardner,A W, PY - 1993/8/1/pubmed PY - 1993/8/1/medline PY - 1993/8/1/entrez SP - 904 EP - 10 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 25 IS - 8 N2 - Although onset and maximal claudication pain are attained sooner as exercise intensity is increased, it is unclear whether dissipation of pain during recovery is altered. Thus, this study examined whether walking at gradually higher intensity would prolong the time needed for claudication pain to dissipate during recovery. Thirty patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who were limited by claudication pain performed repeated progressive treadmill tests to assess walking capacity. Thereafter, each patient performed five treadmill tests at grades relative to their walking capacity (i.e., -4%, -2%, 0%, +2%, and +4% of the final grade attained with the progressive protocol). As expected, a curvilinear decrease in time to onset of claudication pain (191.1, 172.8, 132.8, 113.5, and 112.0 s; P < 0.05) and time to maximal claudication pain (394.2, 358.3, 260.5, 218.1, and 200.3 s; P < 0.05) were obtained with progressively higher grades. However, time needed for claudication pain to dissipate during supine recovery remained unchanged with increased walking intensity (358.5, 339.3, 359.9, 398.2, and 390.5 s; P = NS). In conclusion, when PAD patients walk to maximal claudication pain, dissipation of pain during recovery is similar whether the preceding exercise is performed at relatively low or high intensities. SN - 0195-9131 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8371650/Dissipation_of_claudication_pain_after_walking:_implications_for_endurance_training_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=8371650 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -