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Gallstones in patients with morbid obesity. Relationship to body weight, weight loss and gallbladder bile cholesterol solubility.
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1993 Mar; 17(3):153-8.IJ

Abstract

Gallstones are common in obesity, and in individuals undergoing weight reduction. However, the relationships between body weight, weight reduction, gallbladder bile composition and gallstone formation are not well understood. The present studies were conducted on a cohort of 230 morbidly obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery. Mean body weight ranged from 90-235.4 kg (mean: 136.2 kg). Body mass index (BMI) ranged from 35.4-94.7 kg/m2. Thirty-two patients (14%) had undergone prior cholecystectomy and 48 (21%) were found to have gallstones by intraoperative ultrasonography. No significant relationship was observed between gallstone prevalence and body weight. Following bariatric surgery weight loss averaged 1.57 kg/week over six months. Absolute weight loss ranged from 13.6-81.3 kg. Symptomatic gallstones requiring cholecystectomy developed in 15/150 patients (10%) over two years of follow-up. In contrast, ultrasonography detected asymptomatic gallstones in 34/92 patients (37%) six months following bariatric surgery. No relationship existed between the amount of weight lost and gallstone formation. Gallbladder bile cholesterol solubility remained constant throughout the entire weight range present in this population. No significant difference in cholesterol solubility was present between persons presenting for bariatric surgery and patients who developed symptomatic gallstones and underwent cholecystectomy following weight reduction. We conclude that gallstones are common in patients with severe obesity both before and following bariatric surgery. However, weight loss per se does not appear to be the major determinant of gallstone formation in persons who weigh in excess of 100 kg.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine (Division of Gastroenterology), Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8385075

Citation

Shiffman, M L., et al. "Gallstones in Patients With Morbid Obesity. Relationship to Body Weight, Weight Loss and Gallbladder Bile Cholesterol Solubility." International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 17, no. 3, 1993, pp. 153-8.
Shiffman ML, Sugerman HJ, Kellum JH, et al. Gallstones in patients with morbid obesity. Relationship to body weight, weight loss and gallbladder bile cholesterol solubility. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1993;17(3):153-8.
Shiffman, M. L., Sugerman, H. J., Kellum, J. H., Brewer, W. H., & Moore, E. W. (1993). Gallstones in patients with morbid obesity. Relationship to body weight, weight loss and gallbladder bile cholesterol solubility. International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders : Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 17(3), 153-8.
Shiffman ML, et al. Gallstones in Patients With Morbid Obesity. Relationship to Body Weight, Weight Loss and Gallbladder Bile Cholesterol Solubility. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1993;17(3):153-8. PubMed PMID: 8385075.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gallstones in patients with morbid obesity. Relationship to body weight, weight loss and gallbladder bile cholesterol solubility. AU - Shiffman,M L, AU - Sugerman,H J, AU - Kellum,J H, AU - Brewer,W H, AU - Moore,E W, PY - 1993/3/1/pubmed PY - 1993/3/1/medline PY - 1993/3/1/entrez SP - 153 EP - 8 JF - International journal of obesity and related metabolic disorders : journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - Gallstones are common in obesity, and in individuals undergoing weight reduction. However, the relationships between body weight, weight reduction, gallbladder bile composition and gallstone formation are not well understood. The present studies were conducted on a cohort of 230 morbidly obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery. Mean body weight ranged from 90-235.4 kg (mean: 136.2 kg). Body mass index (BMI) ranged from 35.4-94.7 kg/m2. Thirty-two patients (14%) had undergone prior cholecystectomy and 48 (21%) were found to have gallstones by intraoperative ultrasonography. No significant relationship was observed between gallstone prevalence and body weight. Following bariatric surgery weight loss averaged 1.57 kg/week over six months. Absolute weight loss ranged from 13.6-81.3 kg. Symptomatic gallstones requiring cholecystectomy developed in 15/150 patients (10%) over two years of follow-up. In contrast, ultrasonography detected asymptomatic gallstones in 34/92 patients (37%) six months following bariatric surgery. No relationship existed between the amount of weight lost and gallstone formation. Gallbladder bile cholesterol solubility remained constant throughout the entire weight range present in this population. No significant difference in cholesterol solubility was present between persons presenting for bariatric surgery and patients who developed symptomatic gallstones and underwent cholecystectomy following weight reduction. We conclude that gallstones are common in patients with severe obesity both before and following bariatric surgery. However, weight loss per se does not appear to be the major determinant of gallstone formation in persons who weigh in excess of 100 kg. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8385075/Gallstones_in_patients_with_morbid_obesity__Relationship_to_body_weight_weight_loss_and_gallbladder_bile_cholesterol_solubility_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=8385075 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -