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The pattern of sickle cell disease in pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria.

Abstract

The outcome of pregnancy and labour in patients with sickle cell disease delivered at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) under one obstetrician between 1st January 1985 and 31st December, 1989 is analysed. There were 31 pregnancies in 28 patients with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) and 10 pregnancies in seven patients with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease (HbSc). Six pregnancies in HbSS patients and two in HbSC were in patients who had not had specialized preconceptual care. There was one abortion in a patient with HbSC and one pair of twins in a patient with HbSS. The complication rate was high in HbSC patients as compared to a previous series but not as high as in patients with HbSS. The perinatal mortality rates were 233 and 111 per 1000 deliveries in HbSS and HbSC patients respectively. The maternal mortality rates were 129 and 111 per 1000 deliveries in HbSS and HbSC patients respectively. Two of the maternal deaths and four of the perinatal deaths occurred in HbSS patients who had had no preconceptual specialist care as opposed to those receiving specialist treatment. In the case of perinatal mortality, this was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001).

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria.

Source

MeSH

Adult
Anemia, Sickle Cell
Birth Weight
Blood Transfusion
Cause of Death
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Genotype
Gestational Age
Hemoglobin SC Disease
Humans
Infant Mortality
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Mortality
Nigeria
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Hematologic
Pregnancy Outcome
Prenatal Care
Referral and Consultation

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8398940

Citation

Ogedengbe, O K., and O Akinyanju. "The Pattern of Sickle Cell Disease in Pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria." West African Journal of Medicine, vol. 12, no. 2, 1993, pp. 96-100.
Ogedengbe OK, Akinyanju O. The pattern of sickle cell disease in pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria. West Afr J Med. 1993;12(2):96-100.
Ogedengbe, O. K., & Akinyanju, O. (1993). The pattern of sickle cell disease in pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria. West African Journal of Medicine, 12(2), pp. 96-100.
Ogedengbe OK, Akinyanju O. The Pattern of Sickle Cell Disease in Pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria. West Afr J Med. 1993;12(2):96-100. PubMed PMID: 8398940.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The pattern of sickle cell disease in pregnancy in Lagos, Nigeria. AU - Ogedengbe,O K, AU - Akinyanju,O, PY - 1993/4/1/pubmed PY - 1993/4/1/medline PY - 1993/4/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Biology KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Hematological Effects KW - Hemic System KW - Nigeria KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Pregnancy KW - Pregnancy Outcomes KW - Reproduction KW - Serum Protein Effects KW - Urban Population KW - Western Africa SP - 96 EP - 100 JF - West African journal of medicine JO - West Afr J Med VL - 12 IS - 2 N2 - The outcome of pregnancy and labour in patients with sickle cell disease delivered at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) under one obstetrician between 1st January 1985 and 31st December, 1989 is analysed. There were 31 pregnancies in 28 patients with sickle cell anaemia (HbSS) and 10 pregnancies in seven patients with sickle cell haemoglobin C disease (HbSc). Six pregnancies in HbSS patients and two in HbSC were in patients who had not had specialized preconceptual care. There was one abortion in a patient with HbSC and one pair of twins in a patient with HbSS. The complication rate was high in HbSC patients as compared to a previous series but not as high as in patients with HbSS. The perinatal mortality rates were 233 and 111 per 1000 deliveries in HbSS and HbSC patients respectively. The maternal mortality rates were 129 and 111 per 1000 deliveries in HbSS and HbSC patients respectively. Two of the maternal deaths and four of the perinatal deaths occurred in HbSS patients who had had no preconceptual specialist care as opposed to those receiving specialist treatment. In the case of perinatal mortality, this was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). SN - 0189-160X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8398940/The_pattern_of_sickle_cell_disease_in_pregnancy_in_Lagos_Nigeria_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -