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Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents.
J Adolesc Health 1993; 14(5):369-72JA

Abstract

Maternal weight gain is the most important, manageable determinant of infant birth weight among adolescents. Negative attitudes toward weight gain may adversely affect maternal weight gain. We hypothesized that (a) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain are more common among younger pregnant adolescents, and (b) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain adversely affect adolescent maternal weight gain. The study subjects, 99, radially diverse, pregnant 13 through 18 year olds, completed the 18-item, Likert-format, Pregnancy and Weight Gain Attitude Scale. Responses to the questionnaire indicated that most (83.8%) of the adolescents we interviewed had a positive attitude toward pregnancy weight gain when they entered prenatal care. Univariate analyses revealed that attitudes toward weight gain were unrelated to the respondents' ages but inversely related to their prepregnant weights (-0.16; p = 0.06) and the severity of their symptoms of depression (r = -0.26; p = 0.004). Attitudes toward weight gain were also directly related to their family support (r = 0.17; p = 0.06). Weight gain was significantly related to 4 of the 18 scale items but not to the total attitude scale score. We conclude that (a) the developmental task of formulating a positive body image does not foster more negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain among younger adolescents; (b) negative weight gain attitudes are most common among heavier adolescents, depressed adolescents, and adolescents who do not perceive their families as supportive; and (c) negative weight gain attitudes could adversely affect pregnancy weight gain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver 80218.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8399248

Citation

Stevens-Simon, C, et al. "Weight Gain Attitudes Among Pregnant Adolescents." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 14, no. 5, 1993, pp. 369-72.
Stevens-Simon C, Nakashima I, Andrews D. Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents. J Adolesc Health. 1993;14(5):369-72.
Stevens-Simon, C., Nakashima, I., & Andrews, D. (1993). Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 14(5), pp. 369-72.
Stevens-Simon C, Nakashima I, Andrews D. Weight Gain Attitudes Among Pregnant Adolescents. J Adolesc Health. 1993;14(5):369-72. PubMed PMID: 8399248.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight gain attitudes among pregnant adolescents. AU - Stevens-Simon,C, AU - Nakashima,I, AU - Andrews,D, PY - 1993/7/1/pubmed PY - 1993/7/1/medline PY - 1993/7/1/entrez KW - Adolescent Pregnancy KW - Adolescents KW - Adolescents, Female KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Attitude KW - Behavior KW - Biology KW - Blacks KW - Body Weight KW - Colorado KW - Cultural Background KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Economic Factors KW - Ethnic Groups KW - Fertility KW - Low Income Population KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Prospective Studies KW - Psychological Factors KW - Reproductive Behavior KW - Research Methodology KW - Social Class KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Socioeconomic Status KW - Studies KW - United States KW - Youth SP - 369 EP - 72 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 14 IS - 5 N2 - Maternal weight gain is the most important, manageable determinant of infant birth weight among adolescents. Negative attitudes toward weight gain may adversely affect maternal weight gain. We hypothesized that (a) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain are more common among younger pregnant adolescents, and (b) negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain adversely affect adolescent maternal weight gain. The study subjects, 99, radially diverse, pregnant 13 through 18 year olds, completed the 18-item, Likert-format, Pregnancy and Weight Gain Attitude Scale. Responses to the questionnaire indicated that most (83.8%) of the adolescents we interviewed had a positive attitude toward pregnancy weight gain when they entered prenatal care. Univariate analyses revealed that attitudes toward weight gain were unrelated to the respondents' ages but inversely related to their prepregnant weights (-0.16; p = 0.06) and the severity of their symptoms of depression (r = -0.26; p = 0.004). Attitudes toward weight gain were also directly related to their family support (r = 0.17; p = 0.06). Weight gain was significantly related to 4 of the 18 scale items but not to the total attitude scale score. We conclude that (a) the developmental task of formulating a positive body image does not foster more negative attitudes toward pregnancy weight gain among younger adolescents; (b) negative weight gain attitudes are most common among heavier adolescents, depressed adolescents, and adolescents who do not perceive their families as supportive; and (c) negative weight gain attitudes could adversely affect pregnancy weight gain. SN - 1054-139X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8399248/Weight_gain_attitudes_among_pregnant_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(08)80009-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -