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Advances and current research in ceramic restorative materials.

Abstract

Ceramics are currently the most widely used material for veneering crowns and bridges. Newer applications, such as bonded inlays, onlays, and veneers, are steadily gaining in popularity. A new generation of metal-free, all-ceramic systems for crowns became available during the 1980s. More recently, other all-ceramic systems with improved mechanical properties affording a variety of uses have been introduced. Also, a computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacture method of fabricating ceramic inlays has become a routine treatment entity with favorable 5-year clinical data. Research is leading to a better understanding of conventional ceramic systems as well as providing information on laboratory manipulation and clinical methodology for optimal results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Boston University, Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, Massachusetts.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8401822

Citation

Nathanson, D, and D Riis. "Advances and Current Research in Ceramic Restorative Materials." Current Opinion in Cosmetic Dentistry, 1993, pp. 34-40.
Nathanson D, Riis D. Advances and current research in ceramic restorative materials. Curr Opin Cosmet Dent. 1993.
Nathanson, D., & Riis, D. (1993). Advances and current research in ceramic restorative materials. Current Opinion in Cosmetic Dentistry, 34-40.
Nathanson D, Riis D. Advances and Current Research in Ceramic Restorative Materials. Curr Opin Cosmet Dent. 1993;34-40. PubMed PMID: 8401822.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Advances and current research in ceramic restorative materials. AU - Nathanson,D, AU - Riis,D, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez SP - 34 EP - 40 JF - Current opinion in cosmetic dentistry JO - Curr Opin Cosmet Dent N2 - Ceramics are currently the most widely used material for veneering crowns and bridges. Newer applications, such as bonded inlays, onlays, and veneers, are steadily gaining in popularity. A new generation of metal-free, all-ceramic systems for crowns became available during the 1980s. More recently, other all-ceramic systems with improved mechanical properties affording a variety of uses have been introduced. Also, a computer-assisted design-computer-assisted manufacture method of fabricating ceramic inlays has become a routine treatment entity with favorable 5-year clinical data. Research is leading to a better understanding of conventional ceramic systems as well as providing information on laboratory manipulation and clinical methodology for optimal results. SN - 1065-6278 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8401822/Advances_and_current_research_in_ceramic_restorative_materials_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -