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What's up in the management of high-altitude pulmonary edema?
Md Med J. 1993 Jul; 42(7):641-5.MM

Abstract

Each year, millions of people travel to high-altitude locales. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), a severe form of acute mountain sickness, is a potentially fatal complication of acute exposure to high altitude. HAPE usually occurs at elevations above 2,500 meters and typically develops in the setting of a rapid ascent to high altitude with inadequate acclimatization and continued physical exertion. Although prompt descent to lower elevation and supplemental oxygen remain the definitive treatment for HAPE, recent investigations indicate that administration of nifedipine or phentolamine may be effective prophylactic or temporizing therapies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Maryland Medical System.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8412524

Citation

Tso, E L., and T J. Wagner. "What's Up in the Management of High-altitude Pulmonary Edema?" Maryland Medical Journal (Baltimore, Md. : 1985), vol. 42, no. 7, 1993, pp. 641-5.
Tso EL, Wagner TJ. What's up in the management of high-altitude pulmonary edema? Md Med J. 1993;42(7):641-5.
Tso, E. L., & Wagner, T. J. (1993). What's up in the management of high-altitude pulmonary edema? Maryland Medical Journal (Baltimore, Md. : 1985), 42(7), 641-5.
Tso EL, Wagner TJ. What's Up in the Management of High-altitude Pulmonary Edema. Md Med J. 1993;42(7):641-5. PubMed PMID: 8412524.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What's up in the management of high-altitude pulmonary edema? AU - Tso,E L, AU - Wagner,T J,Jr PY - 1993/7/1/pubmed PY - 2001/3/28/medline PY - 1993/7/1/entrez SP - 641 EP - 5 JF - Maryland medical journal (Baltimore, Md. : 1985) JO - Md Med J VL - 42 IS - 7 N2 - Each year, millions of people travel to high-altitude locales. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), a severe form of acute mountain sickness, is a potentially fatal complication of acute exposure to high altitude. HAPE usually occurs at elevations above 2,500 meters and typically develops in the setting of a rapid ascent to high altitude with inadequate acclimatization and continued physical exertion. Although prompt descent to lower elevation and supplemental oxygen remain the definitive treatment for HAPE, recent investigations indicate that administration of nifedipine or phentolamine may be effective prophylactic or temporizing therapies. SN - 0886-0572 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8412524/What's_up_in_the_management_of_high_altitude_pulmonary_edema L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/2473 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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