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The role of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in the development of otitis media with effusion: a review.

Abstract

Otitis media with effusion is the most common cause of hearing loss in children today. This report examines the role of immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity in the development of otitis media with effusion. It is emphasized that immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity, or allergy, represents only one variable in a very complex disease entity. Bacterial infection, viral infection, and mucociliary clearance are important variables that must be considered and may be effected by the allergic response. On the basis of the world literature and laboratory investigations at the Children's Hospital of Buffalo, it is concluded that otitis media is associated with allergy in 35% to 40% of cases. Furthermore, the middle ear mucosa itself is rarely a target organ for allergy. Release of biologic mediators of inflammation from basophils and mast cells occurs in the nasal mucosa and nasopharyngeal mucosa. These mediators most likely produce eustachian tube edema and inflammation. Over a long period this chronic inflammatory response, along with viral or bacterial infection, produces middle ear effusion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, State University of New York at Buffalo.

Source

MeSH

Child
Child, Preschool
Eustachian Tube
Food Hypersensitivity
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate
Immunoglobulin E
Infant
Nasal Provocation Tests
Otitis Media with Effusion
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8414590

Citation

Bernstein, J M.. "The Role of IgE-mediated Hypersensitivity in the Development of Otitis Media With Effusion: a Review." Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 109, no. 3 Pt 2, 1993, pp. 611-20.
Bernstein JM. The role of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in the development of otitis media with effusion: a review. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993;109(3 Pt 2):611-20.
Bernstein, J. M. (1993). The role of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in the development of otitis media with effusion: a review. Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 109(3 Pt 2), pp. 611-20.
Bernstein JM. The Role of IgE-mediated Hypersensitivity in the Development of Otitis Media With Effusion: a Review. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993;109(3 Pt 2):611-20. PubMed PMID: 8414590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in the development of otitis media with effusion: a review. A1 - Bernstein,J M, PY - 1993/9/1/pubmed PY - 1993/9/1/medline PY - 1993/9/1/entrez SP - 611 EP - 20 JF - Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery JO - Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 109 IS - 3 Pt 2 N2 - Otitis media with effusion is the most common cause of hearing loss in children today. This report examines the role of immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity in the development of otitis media with effusion. It is emphasized that immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity, or allergy, represents only one variable in a very complex disease entity. Bacterial infection, viral infection, and mucociliary clearance are important variables that must be considered and may be effected by the allergic response. On the basis of the world literature and laboratory investigations at the Children's Hospital of Buffalo, it is concluded that otitis media is associated with allergy in 35% to 40% of cases. Furthermore, the middle ear mucosa itself is rarely a target organ for allergy. Release of biologic mediators of inflammation from basophils and mast cells occurs in the nasal mucosa and nasopharyngeal mucosa. These mediators most likely produce eustachian tube edema and inflammation. Over a long period this chronic inflammatory response, along with viral or bacterial infection, produces middle ear effusion. SN - 0194-5998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8414590/full_citation DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -