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Dietary fish oil augments nitric oxide production or release in patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.
Diabetologia. 1993 Jan; 36(1):33-8.D

Abstract

Decreased release of nitric oxide from damaged endothelium is responsible for the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses found in animal models of vascular disease. Dietary supplementation with fish oils has been shown to augment endothelium-dependent relaxations, principally by improving the release of nitric oxide from injured endothelium. Using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography we studied vascular responses to 60, 120, 180 and 240 nmol/min of acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and 3, 6 and 9 nmol/min of glyceryl trinitrate (an endothelium-independent vasodilator) infused into the brachial artery in 23 patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. NG monomethyl-L-arginine was employed to inhibit stimulated and basal release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. On completion of the baseline studies patients randomly received either fish oil or matching olive oil capsules in a double-blind crossover fashion for 6 weeks followed by a 6-week washout period and a final 6-week treatment phase. Studies, identical to the initial baseline studies, were performed at the end of the active treatment periods at 6 and 18 weeks. Fish oil supplementation significantly improved forearm blood flow responses to each dose of acetylcholine when compared to the vasodilator responses recorded at baseline and after olive oil administration (p < 0.01). Neither fish oil nor olive oil supplementation produced any significant changes in forearm blood flow to the incremental infusions of glyceryl trinitrate when compared with responses recorded during the baseline studies.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Therapeutics and Pharmacology, Queen's University of Belfast, Northern Ireland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8436250

Citation

McVeigh, G E., et al. "Dietary Fish Oil Augments Nitric Oxide Production or Release in Patients With Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus." Diabetologia, vol. 36, no. 1, 1993, pp. 33-8.
McVeigh GE, Brennan GM, Johnston GD, et al. Dietary fish oil augments nitric oxide production or release in patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Diabetologia. 1993;36(1):33-8.
McVeigh, G. E., Brennan, G. M., Johnston, G. D., McDermott, B. J., McGrath, L. T., Henry, W. R., Andrews, J. W., & Hayes, J. R. (1993). Dietary fish oil augments nitric oxide production or release in patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Diabetologia, 36(1), 33-8.
McVeigh GE, et al. Dietary Fish Oil Augments Nitric Oxide Production or Release in Patients With Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetologia. 1993;36(1):33-8. PubMed PMID: 8436250.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fish oil augments nitric oxide production or release in patients with type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. AU - McVeigh,G E, AU - Brennan,G M, AU - Johnston,G D, AU - McDermott,B J, AU - McGrath,L T, AU - Henry,W R, AU - Andrews,J W, AU - Hayes,J R, PY - 1993/1/1/pubmed PY - 1993/1/1/medline PY - 1993/1/1/entrez SP - 33 EP - 8 JF - Diabetologia JO - Diabetologia VL - 36 IS - 1 N2 - Decreased release of nitric oxide from damaged endothelium is responsible for the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilator responses found in animal models of vascular disease. Dietary supplementation with fish oils has been shown to augment endothelium-dependent relaxations, principally by improving the release of nitric oxide from injured endothelium. Using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography we studied vascular responses to 60, 120, 180 and 240 nmol/min of acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and 3, 6 and 9 nmol/min of glyceryl trinitrate (an endothelium-independent vasodilator) infused into the brachial artery in 23 patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. NG monomethyl-L-arginine was employed to inhibit stimulated and basal release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. On completion of the baseline studies patients randomly received either fish oil or matching olive oil capsules in a double-blind crossover fashion for 6 weeks followed by a 6-week washout period and a final 6-week treatment phase. Studies, identical to the initial baseline studies, were performed at the end of the active treatment periods at 6 and 18 weeks. Fish oil supplementation significantly improved forearm blood flow responses to each dose of acetylcholine when compared to the vasodilator responses recorded at baseline and after olive oil administration (p < 0.01). Neither fish oil nor olive oil supplementation produced any significant changes in forearm blood flow to the incremental infusions of glyceryl trinitrate when compared with responses recorded during the baseline studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0012-186X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8436250/Dietary_fish_oil_augments_nitric_oxide_production_or_release_in_patients_with_type_2__non_insulin_dependent__diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/8215 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -