Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Analysis of the protective effect of different sunscreens on ultraviolet radiation-induced local and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and inflammatory responses in mice.
J Invest Dermatol. 1993 Mar; 100(3):254-9.JI

Abstract

We investigated the capacity of three sunscreen compounds to protect mice from the inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The sunscreen preparations contained 7.5% 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate, 8% octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate, or 6% benzophenone-3 in an oil-in-water emulsion. Skin swelling was used as the measure of their effect on UVR-induced inflammation, and immunosuppression was assessed by contact sensitization with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene applied to UV-irradiated skin (local suppression) or a distant site (systemic suppression). The sunscreens were applied to the shaved dorsal skin of C3H mice, which were then given a single dose of UVR ranging from 2 to 32 kJ/m2 within the UVB (280-320 nm) region. All three sunscreens gave complete protection against local suppression of contact hypersensitivity caused by a dose of 2 kJ/m2 UVB. They also protected against both inflammation and systemic immunosuppression caused by UVR; however, protection was highly dependent on the UVR dose. Furthermore, the sunscreens were less effective in protecting against systemic immunosuppression than against inflammation. These results indicate that immunosuppression is less sensitive to the protective effects of the sunscreens than inflammation and that protection against UVR-induced inflammation does not necessarily imply prevention of immunologic alterations. In addition, these studies suggest that UVR-induced immunosuppression and inflammation may involve different mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Immunology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston 77030.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8440898

Citation

Wolf, P, et al. "Analysis of the Protective Effect of Different Sunscreens On Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Local and Systemic Suppression of Contact Hypersensitivity and Inflammatory Responses in Mice." The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 100, no. 3, 1993, pp. 254-9.
Wolf P, Donawho CK, Kripke ML. Analysis of the protective effect of different sunscreens on ultraviolet radiation-induced local and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and inflammatory responses in mice. J Invest Dermatol. 1993;100(3):254-9.
Wolf, P., Donawho, C. K., & Kripke, M. L. (1993). Analysis of the protective effect of different sunscreens on ultraviolet radiation-induced local and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and inflammatory responses in mice. The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 100(3), 254-9.
Wolf P, Donawho CK, Kripke ML. Analysis of the Protective Effect of Different Sunscreens On Ultraviolet Radiation-induced Local and Systemic Suppression of Contact Hypersensitivity and Inflammatory Responses in Mice. J Invest Dermatol. 1993;100(3):254-9. PubMed PMID: 8440898.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analysis of the protective effect of different sunscreens on ultraviolet radiation-induced local and systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and inflammatory responses in mice. AU - Wolf,P, AU - Donawho,C K, AU - Kripke,M L, PY - 1993/3/1/pubmed PY - 1993/3/1/medline PY - 1993/3/1/entrez SP - 254 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of investigative dermatology JO - J Invest Dermatol VL - 100 IS - 3 N2 - We investigated the capacity of three sunscreen compounds to protect mice from the inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR). The sunscreen preparations contained 7.5% 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate, 8% octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate, or 6% benzophenone-3 in an oil-in-water emulsion. Skin swelling was used as the measure of their effect on UVR-induced inflammation, and immunosuppression was assessed by contact sensitization with 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene applied to UV-irradiated skin (local suppression) or a distant site (systemic suppression). The sunscreens were applied to the shaved dorsal skin of C3H mice, which were then given a single dose of UVR ranging from 2 to 32 kJ/m2 within the UVB (280-320 nm) region. All three sunscreens gave complete protection against local suppression of contact hypersensitivity caused by a dose of 2 kJ/m2 UVB. They also protected against both inflammation and systemic immunosuppression caused by UVR; however, protection was highly dependent on the UVR dose. Furthermore, the sunscreens were less effective in protecting against systemic immunosuppression than against inflammation. These results indicate that immunosuppression is less sensitive to the protective effects of the sunscreens than inflammation and that protection against UVR-induced inflammation does not necessarily imply prevention of immunologic alterations. In addition, these studies suggest that UVR-induced immunosuppression and inflammation may involve different mechanisms. SN - 0022-202X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8440898/Analysis_of_the_protective_effect_of_different_sunscreens_on_ultraviolet_radiation_induced_local_and_systemic_suppression_of_contact_hypersensitivity_and_inflammatory_responses_in_mice_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-202X(93)90181-G DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -