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The prevalence of Giardia and other intestinal parasites in children, dogs and cats from aboriginal communities in the Kimberley.
Med J Aust. 1993 Feb 01; 158(3):157-9.MJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of Giardia duodenalis and other intestinal parasites in children, dogs and cats from Aboriginal communities in the west Kimberley region of Western Australia.

DESIGN

A four-year parasitological survey of faecal specimens from humans and faecal and intestinal specimens from dogs and cats.

SETTING

Local hospital servicing Aboriginal communities surveyed in this study and the Veterinary School, Murdoch University.

POPULATION

Children (under 14 years) and adults, as well as dogs and cats, from five Aboriginal communities.

RESULTS

G. duodenalis was the most prevalent parasite in children and adults (32.1% in children, n = 361; 12.5% in adults, n = 24). Human infections with Hymenolepis nana (20.5%) and Entamoeba coli (13.0%) were also common. Ancylostoma duodenale (1.3%), Pentatrichomonas hominis (1.0%), Chilomastix mesnili (0.52%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.52%), Sarcocystis sp. (0.52%), Trichuris trichiura (0.26%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.26%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.26%) and Isospora belli (0.26%) were present at low rates. Dogs were most commonly infected with Ancylostoma caninum (51.1%) and G. duodenalis (17.0%). Cats were found to have a high prevalence of Ancylostoma tubaeforme (18.2%), Toxoplasma gondii (18.2%), Isospora felis (15.1%) and Spirometra erinacei (15.1%).

CONCLUSIONS

This study has shown that children from Aboriginal communities in the west Kimberley region of Western Australia, particularly in the age group one to five years, are commonly infected with intestinal parasites. The dogs and cats in these communities are also infected. The high prevalence rates of Giardia and other enteric parasites in this survey are indicative of poor living conditions and low levels of hygiene. In addition, the high prevalence of hookworm and Giardia infection in dogs and hookworm and Toxoplasma infection in cats is of potential zoonotic significance for humans in these communities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Veterinary Studies, Murdoch University, WA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8450779

Citation

Meloni, B P., et al. "The Prevalence of Giardia and Other Intestinal Parasites in Children, Dogs and Cats From Aboriginal Communities in the Kimberley." The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 158, no. 3, 1993, pp. 157-9.
Meloni BP, Thompson RC, Hopkins RM, et al. The prevalence of Giardia and other intestinal parasites in children, dogs and cats from aboriginal communities in the Kimberley. Med J Aust. 1993;158(3):157-9.
Meloni, B. P., Thompson, R. C., Hopkins, R. M., Reynoldson, J. A., & Gracey, M. (1993). The prevalence of Giardia and other intestinal parasites in children, dogs and cats from aboriginal communities in the Kimberley. The Medical Journal of Australia, 158(3), 157-9.
Meloni BP, et al. The Prevalence of Giardia and Other Intestinal Parasites in Children, Dogs and Cats From Aboriginal Communities in the Kimberley. Med J Aust. 1993 Feb 1;158(3):157-9. PubMed PMID: 8450779.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The prevalence of Giardia and other intestinal parasites in children, dogs and cats from aboriginal communities in the Kimberley. AU - Meloni,B P, AU - Thompson,R C, AU - Hopkins,R M, AU - Reynoldson,J A, AU - Gracey,M, PY - 1993/2/1/pubmed PY - 1993/2/1/medline PY - 1993/2/1/entrez SP - 157 EP - 9 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med. J. Aust. VL - 158 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Giardia duodenalis and other intestinal parasites in children, dogs and cats from Aboriginal communities in the west Kimberley region of Western Australia. DESIGN: A four-year parasitological survey of faecal specimens from humans and faecal and intestinal specimens from dogs and cats. SETTING: Local hospital servicing Aboriginal communities surveyed in this study and the Veterinary School, Murdoch University. POPULATION: Children (under 14 years) and adults, as well as dogs and cats, from five Aboriginal communities. RESULTS: G. duodenalis was the most prevalent parasite in children and adults (32.1% in children, n = 361; 12.5% in adults, n = 24). Human infections with Hymenolepis nana (20.5%) and Entamoeba coli (13.0%) were also common. Ancylostoma duodenale (1.3%), Pentatrichomonas hominis (1.0%), Chilomastix mesnili (0.52%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.52%), Sarcocystis sp. (0.52%), Trichuris trichiura (0.26%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.26%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.26%) and Isospora belli (0.26%) were present at low rates. Dogs were most commonly infected with Ancylostoma caninum (51.1%) and G. duodenalis (17.0%). Cats were found to have a high prevalence of Ancylostoma tubaeforme (18.2%), Toxoplasma gondii (18.2%), Isospora felis (15.1%) and Spirometra erinacei (15.1%). CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that children from Aboriginal communities in the west Kimberley region of Western Australia, particularly in the age group one to five years, are commonly infected with intestinal parasites. The dogs and cats in these communities are also infected. The high prevalence rates of Giardia and other enteric parasites in this survey are indicative of poor living conditions and low levels of hygiene. In addition, the high prevalence of hookworm and Giardia infection in dogs and hookworm and Toxoplasma infection in cats is of potential zoonotic significance for humans in these communities. SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8450779/The_prevalence_of_Giardia_and_other_intestinal_parasites_in_children_dogs_and_cats_from_aboriginal_communities_in_the_Kimberley_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0025-729X&date=1993&volume=158&issue=3&spage=157 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -