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A randomized controlled study of evening primrose oil and fish oil in ulcerative colitis.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1993; 7(2):159-66AP

Abstract

In a placebo-controlled study, 43 patients with stable ulcerative colitis were randomized to receive either MaxEPA (n = 16), super evening primrose oil (n = 19), or olive oil as placebo (n = 8) for 6 months, in addition to their usual treatment. Treatment with MaxEPA increased red-cell membrane concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) at 3 months by three-fold and at 6 months by four-fold (both P < 0.01), and doubled docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels at 6 months (P < 0.05). Treatment with super evening primrose oil increased red-cell membrane concentrations of dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) by 40% at 6 months (P < 0.05), whilst treatment with placebo reduced levels of DGLA and DHA at 6 months (both P < 0.05). Clinical outcome was assessed by patient diary cards, sigmoidoscopy and histology of rectal biopsy specimens. Super evening primrose oil significantly improved stool consistency compared to MaxEPA and placebo at 6 months, and this difference was maintained 3 months after treatment was discontinued (P < 0.05). There was however, no difference in stool frequency, rectal bleeding, disease relapse, sigmoidoscopic appearance or rectal histology in the three treatment groups. Despite manipulation of cell-membrane fatty acids, fish oils do not exert a therapeutic effect in ulcerative colitis, while evening primrose oil may be of some benefit.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gastrointestinal Laboratory, Rayne Institute, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8485269

Citation

Greenfield, S M., et al. "A Randomized Controlled Study of Evening Primrose Oil and Fish Oil in Ulcerative Colitis." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 7, no. 2, 1993, pp. 159-66.
Greenfield SM, Green AT, Teare JP, et al. A randomized controlled study of evening primrose oil and fish oil in ulcerative colitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1993;7(2):159-66.
Greenfield, S. M., Green, A. T., Teare, J. P., Jenkins, A. P., Punchard, N. A., Ainley, C. C., & Thompson, R. P. (1993). A randomized controlled study of evening primrose oil and fish oil in ulcerative colitis. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 7(2), pp. 159-66.
Greenfield SM, et al. A Randomized Controlled Study of Evening Primrose Oil and Fish Oil in Ulcerative Colitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 1993;7(2):159-66. PubMed PMID: 8485269.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized controlled study of evening primrose oil and fish oil in ulcerative colitis. AU - Greenfield,S M, AU - Green,A T, AU - Teare,J P, AU - Jenkins,A P, AU - Punchard,N A, AU - Ainley,C C, AU - Thompson,R P, PY - 1993/4/1/pubmed PY - 1993/4/1/medline PY - 1993/4/1/entrez SP - 159 EP - 66 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 7 IS - 2 N2 - In a placebo-controlled study, 43 patients with stable ulcerative colitis were randomized to receive either MaxEPA (n = 16), super evening primrose oil (n = 19), or olive oil as placebo (n = 8) for 6 months, in addition to their usual treatment. Treatment with MaxEPA increased red-cell membrane concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) at 3 months by three-fold and at 6 months by four-fold (both P < 0.01), and doubled docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels at 6 months (P < 0.05). Treatment with super evening primrose oil increased red-cell membrane concentrations of dihomogamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) by 40% at 6 months (P < 0.05), whilst treatment with placebo reduced levels of DGLA and DHA at 6 months (both P < 0.05). Clinical outcome was assessed by patient diary cards, sigmoidoscopy and histology of rectal biopsy specimens. Super evening primrose oil significantly improved stool consistency compared to MaxEPA and placebo at 6 months, and this difference was maintained 3 months after treatment was discontinued (P < 0.05). There was however, no difference in stool frequency, rectal bleeding, disease relapse, sigmoidoscopic appearance or rectal histology in the three treatment groups. Despite manipulation of cell-membrane fatty acids, fish oils do not exert a therapeutic effect in ulcerative colitis, while evening primrose oil may be of some benefit. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8485269/A_randomized_controlled_study_of_evening_primrose_oil_and_fish_oil_in_ulcerative_colitis_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0269-2813&amp;date=1993&amp;volume=7&amp;issue=2&amp;spage=159 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -