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Microflora and acidification properties of yogurt and yogurt-related products fermented with commercially available starter cultures.
Int J Food Microbiol. 1993 May; 18(3):179-89.IJ

Abstract

Yogurts and yogurt-related milk products were produced using 44 commercially available starter cultures from 8 suppliers. The yogurt starters consisted of the classical yogurt microflora and the yogurt-related cultures containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and/or Bifidobacterium spp. instead of or in addition to the yogurt bacteria. The counts of lactobacilli in the fresh yogurts varied between 5.5 x 10(7) and 6.5 x 10(8) CFU/ml, and the counts of streptococci varied from 3.5 x 10(7) to 1.2 x 10(9) CFU/ml. About 80% of the yogurts had higher counts of cocci than rods. During storage of the products for 2 weeks at 6 degrees C the stability of the microflora differed markedly among the cultures. In the fresh yogurt-related products the L. acidophilus counts ranged from 4.0 x 10(5) to 2.6 x 10(8) CFU/ml; bifidobacteria were found at levels between 4.0 x 10(6) and 2.6 x 10(8) CFU/ml. In most products reduced viable counts of these bacteria were observed after 2 weeks. Titratable acidity increased on average by 22.3% in the yogurts, and by 14.9% in the yogurt-related products during storage. In most products a higher amount of L(+)- than D(-)-lactic acid was found.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dairy Research and Bacteriology, Agricultural University, Vienna, Austria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8494687

Citation

Kneifel, W, et al. "Microflora and Acidification Properties of Yogurt and Yogurt-related Products Fermented With Commercially Available Starter Cultures." International Journal of Food Microbiology, vol. 18, no. 3, 1993, pp. 179-89.
Kneifel W, Jaros D, Erhard F. Microflora and acidification properties of yogurt and yogurt-related products fermented with commercially available starter cultures. Int J Food Microbiol. 1993;18(3):179-89.
Kneifel, W., Jaros, D., & Erhard, F. (1993). Microflora and acidification properties of yogurt and yogurt-related products fermented with commercially available starter cultures. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 18(3), 179-89.
Kneifel W, Jaros D, Erhard F. Microflora and Acidification Properties of Yogurt and Yogurt-related Products Fermented With Commercially Available Starter Cultures. Int J Food Microbiol. 1993;18(3):179-89. PubMed PMID: 8494687.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microflora and acidification properties of yogurt and yogurt-related products fermented with commercially available starter cultures. AU - Kneifel,W, AU - Jaros,D, AU - Erhard,F, PY - 1993/5/1/pubmed PY - 1993/5/1/medline PY - 1993/5/1/entrez SP - 179 EP - 89 JF - International journal of food microbiology JO - Int J Food Microbiol VL - 18 IS - 3 N2 - Yogurts and yogurt-related milk products were produced using 44 commercially available starter cultures from 8 suppliers. The yogurt starters consisted of the classical yogurt microflora and the yogurt-related cultures containing Lactobacillus acidophilus and/or Bifidobacterium spp. instead of or in addition to the yogurt bacteria. The counts of lactobacilli in the fresh yogurts varied between 5.5 x 10(7) and 6.5 x 10(8) CFU/ml, and the counts of streptococci varied from 3.5 x 10(7) to 1.2 x 10(9) CFU/ml. About 80% of the yogurts had higher counts of cocci than rods. During storage of the products for 2 weeks at 6 degrees C the stability of the microflora differed markedly among the cultures. In the fresh yogurt-related products the L. acidophilus counts ranged from 4.0 x 10(5) to 2.6 x 10(8) CFU/ml; bifidobacteria were found at levels between 4.0 x 10(6) and 2.6 x 10(8) CFU/ml. In most products reduced viable counts of these bacteria were observed after 2 weeks. Titratable acidity increased on average by 22.3% in the yogurts, and by 14.9% in the yogurt-related products during storage. In most products a higher amount of L(+)- than D(-)-lactic acid was found. SN - 0168-1605 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8494687/Microflora_and_acidification_properties_of_yogurt_and_yogurt_related_products_fermented_with_commercially_available_starter_cultures_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -