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Esophageal motility in low-grade reflux esophagitis, evaluated by stationary and 24-hour ambulatory manometry.
Am J Gastroenterol. 1993 Jun; 88(6):837-41.AJ

Abstract

Whereas previous studies have unequivocally shown that esophageal motility is abnormal in patients with severe reflux esophagitis, the results of motility testing in patients with low-grade esophagitis are inconsistent. We studied 27 patients with Savary grade I and II esophagitis and 24 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Both underwent conventional manometry and 24-h ambulatory pH and pressure monitoring. Esophageal acid exposure was greater in patients than controls. The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was significantly lower in esophagitis patients [1.46 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.79 +/- 0.11 kPa (10.98 +/- 0.68 vs. 13.46 +/- 0.83 mm Hg)]. The total number of contractions recorded in the 24-h period was not different in the patient group (2168 +/- 108.4 vs. 2033 +/- 130.5), but esophagitis patients had an increased number of nontransmitted contractions (968 +/- 39.4 vs. 773 +/- 50.2, p < 0.01). A tendency toward a decreased prevalence of peristaltic contractions just failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.07). Both conventional manometry and 24-h monitoring showed no significant difference in peristaltic amplitude between the two groups. Differences in contraction duration (2.02 +/- 0.08 vs. 2.39 +/- 0.12 s, p < 0.01) and velocity of the peristaltic wave (3.65 +/- 0.10 vs. 4.63 +/- 0.13 cm/s, p < 0.01) were only detected by 24-h monitoring. The findings made in this study do not support the concept that impaired esophageal peristalsis is a major factor in the pathogenesis of low-grade esophagitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8503376

Citation

Timmer, R, et al. "Esophageal Motility in Low-grade Reflux Esophagitis, Evaluated By Stationary and 24-hour Ambulatory Manometry." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 88, no. 6, 1993, pp. 837-41.
Timmer R, Breumelhof R, Nadorp JH, et al. Esophageal motility in low-grade reflux esophagitis, evaluated by stationary and 24-hour ambulatory manometry. Am J Gastroenterol. 1993;88(6):837-41.
Timmer, R., Breumelhof, R., Nadorp, J. H., & Smout, A. J. (1993). Esophageal motility in low-grade reflux esophagitis, evaluated by stationary and 24-hour ambulatory manometry. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 88(6), 837-41.
Timmer R, et al. Esophageal Motility in Low-grade Reflux Esophagitis, Evaluated By Stationary and 24-hour Ambulatory Manometry. Am J Gastroenterol. 1993;88(6):837-41. PubMed PMID: 8503376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Esophageal motility in low-grade reflux esophagitis, evaluated by stationary and 24-hour ambulatory manometry. AU - Timmer,R, AU - Breumelhof,R, AU - Nadorp,J H, AU - Smout,A J, PY - 1993/6/1/pubmed PY - 1993/6/1/medline PY - 1993/6/1/entrez SP - 837 EP - 41 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 88 IS - 6 N2 - Whereas previous studies have unequivocally shown that esophageal motility is abnormal in patients with severe reflux esophagitis, the results of motility testing in patients with low-grade esophagitis are inconsistent. We studied 27 patients with Savary grade I and II esophagitis and 24 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Both underwent conventional manometry and 24-h ambulatory pH and pressure monitoring. Esophageal acid exposure was greater in patients than controls. The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure was significantly lower in esophagitis patients [1.46 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.79 +/- 0.11 kPa (10.98 +/- 0.68 vs. 13.46 +/- 0.83 mm Hg)]. The total number of contractions recorded in the 24-h period was not different in the patient group (2168 +/- 108.4 vs. 2033 +/- 130.5), but esophagitis patients had an increased number of nontransmitted contractions (968 +/- 39.4 vs. 773 +/- 50.2, p < 0.01). A tendency toward a decreased prevalence of peristaltic contractions just failed to reach statistical significance (p = 0.07). Both conventional manometry and 24-h monitoring showed no significant difference in peristaltic amplitude between the two groups. Differences in contraction duration (2.02 +/- 0.08 vs. 2.39 +/- 0.12 s, p < 0.01) and velocity of the peristaltic wave (3.65 +/- 0.10 vs. 4.63 +/- 0.13 cm/s, p < 0.01) were only detected by 24-h monitoring. The findings made in this study do not support the concept that impaired esophageal peristalsis is a major factor in the pathogenesis of low-grade esophagitis. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8503376/Esophageal_motility_in_low_grade_reflux_esophagitis_evaluated_by_stationary_and_24_hour_ambulatory_manometry_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -