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Sentinel surveillance for HIV-1 infection: how representative are blood donors, outpatients with fever, anaemia, or sexually transmitted diseases, and antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza Region, Tanzania?
AIDS. 1993 Apr; 7(4):567-72.AIDS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the validity of extrapolation from sentinel data by comparing the HIV-1 prevalence of various sentinel groups with that of the general population in Mwanza Region, Tanzania.

METHODS

In a population survey, 4161 individuals were selected in a stratified random cluster sample. Sentinel groups (all in the age group 15-54 years) included blood donors (n = 1090); patients examined at district hospitals for the presence of malaria parasites (n = 1488), anaemia (n = 1339), or syphilis (n = 33); and antenatal clinic attenders (n = 1193). The HIV-1 serostatus of individuals selected from the population survey was tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot; 51% of the blood donors were tested using HIVCHEK, and all others using ELISA. HIV-1 prevalence was standardized for age, sex, and urban/non-urban location.

RESULTS

HIV-1 prevalence (standardized by age, sex, and residence) in Mwanza Region was 4.0% (3.0% in non-urban areas and 11.3% in town). The standardized HIV-1 prevalences in the sentinel groups were: blood donors, 4.5%; patients with fever, 11.6%; patients with anaemia, 8.9%; urban sexually transmitted disease patients, 27.1%; urban antenatal clinic attenders, 11.8%. The crude prevalence in blood donors was 6.0%.

CONCLUSION

Blood donors who are related to blood recipients appear to be a representative sentinel group in this region, provided that data are standardized for age, sex, and urban/non-urban location. Patients with fever and antenatal clinic attenders may reflect trends, but data from patients with fever markedly overestimate, and data from antenatal clinic attenders underestimate, population HIV-1 prevalence. Because self-selection of blood donors may become more pronounced, this comparison should be repeated later or elsewhere, should the opportunity arise.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Medical Research, Mwanza, Tanzania.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8507421

Citation

Borgdorff, M, et al. "Sentinel Surveillance for HIV-1 Infection: How Representative Are Blood Donors, Outpatients With Fever, Anaemia, or Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Antenatal Clinic Attenders in Mwanza Region, Tanzania?" AIDS (London, England), vol. 7, no. 4, 1993, pp. 567-72.
Borgdorff M, Barongo L, van Jaarsveld E, et al. Sentinel surveillance for HIV-1 infection: how representative are blood donors, outpatients with fever, anaemia, or sexually transmitted diseases, and antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza Region, Tanzania? AIDS. 1993;7(4):567-72.
Borgdorff, M., Barongo, L., van Jaarsveld, E., Klokke, A., Senkoro, K., Newell, J., Nicoll, A., Mosha, F., Grosskurth, H., & Swai, R. (1993). Sentinel surveillance for HIV-1 infection: how representative are blood donors, outpatients with fever, anaemia, or sexually transmitted diseases, and antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza Region, Tanzania? AIDS (London, England), 7(4), 567-72.
Borgdorff M, et al. Sentinel Surveillance for HIV-1 Infection: How Representative Are Blood Donors, Outpatients With Fever, Anaemia, or Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Antenatal Clinic Attenders in Mwanza Region, Tanzania. AIDS. 1993;7(4):567-72. PubMed PMID: 8507421.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sentinel surveillance for HIV-1 infection: how representative are blood donors, outpatients with fever, anaemia, or sexually transmitted diseases, and antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza Region, Tanzania? A1 - Borgdorff,M, AU - Barongo,L, AU - van Jaarsveld,E, AU - Klokke,A, AU - Senkoro,K, AU - Newell,J, AU - Nicoll,A, AU - Mosha,F, AU - Grosskurth,H, AU - Swai,R, PY - 1993/4/1/pubmed PY - 1993/4/1/medline PY - 1993/4/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Africa South Of The Sahara KW - Delivery Of Health Care KW - Demographic Factors KW - Demographic Surveys KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Eastern Africa KW - English Speaking Africa KW - Health KW - Health Facilities KW - Health Surveys KW - Hiv Infections KW - Hospitals KW - Infections KW - Measurement KW - Outpatient Clinic KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Pregnancy KW - Prevalence KW - Reproduction KW - Reproductive Tract Infections KW - Research Methodology KW - Sexually Transmitted Diseases KW - Tanzania KW - Viral Diseases SP - 567 EP - 72 JF - AIDS (London, England) JO - AIDS VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the validity of extrapolation from sentinel data by comparing the HIV-1 prevalence of various sentinel groups with that of the general population in Mwanza Region, Tanzania. METHODS: In a population survey, 4161 individuals were selected in a stratified random cluster sample. Sentinel groups (all in the age group 15-54 years) included blood donors (n = 1090); patients examined at district hospitals for the presence of malaria parasites (n = 1488), anaemia (n = 1339), or syphilis (n = 33); and antenatal clinic attenders (n = 1193). The HIV-1 serostatus of individuals selected from the population survey was tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot; 51% of the blood donors were tested using HIVCHEK, and all others using ELISA. HIV-1 prevalence was standardized for age, sex, and urban/non-urban location. RESULTS: HIV-1 prevalence (standardized by age, sex, and residence) in Mwanza Region was 4.0% (3.0% in non-urban areas and 11.3% in town). The standardized HIV-1 prevalences in the sentinel groups were: blood donors, 4.5%; patients with fever, 11.6%; patients with anaemia, 8.9%; urban sexually transmitted disease patients, 27.1%; urban antenatal clinic attenders, 11.8%. The crude prevalence in blood donors was 6.0%. CONCLUSION: Blood donors who are related to blood recipients appear to be a representative sentinel group in this region, provided that data are standardized for age, sex, and urban/non-urban location. Patients with fever and antenatal clinic attenders may reflect trends, but data from patients with fever markedly overestimate, and data from antenatal clinic attenders underestimate, population HIV-1 prevalence. Because self-selection of blood donors may become more pronounced, this comparison should be repeated later or elsewhere, should the opportunity arise. SN - 0269-9370 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8507421/Sentinel_surveillance_for_HIV_1_infection:_how_representative_are_blood_donors_outpatients_with_fever_anaemia_or_sexually_transmitted_diseases_and_antenatal_clinic_attenders_in_Mwanza_Region_Tanzania L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=8507421.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -