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Contraceptive methods for women with neurologic disorders.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993 Jun; 168(6 Pt 2):2027-32.AJ

Abstract

Sex steroids in oral contraceptives exert several effects on the central nervous system and are therefore of concern when used by neurologically compromised women. In general, oral contraceptives do not aggravate epileptic seizures and are not contraindicated in cases of tension headache. Oral contraceptives can be used in cases of migraine without focal neurologic symptoms as long as headache symptoms do not worsen. Levels of sex steroids can be diminished through enzyme induction by antiepileptic drugs, giving rise to the possibility of contraceptive failure and exposure of the fetus to the teratogenic properties of antiseizure medications. Women with common migraine (without focal neurologic symptoms) who are taking oral contraceptives should be monitored for possible exacerbation of their symptoms. Women who do experience worsening of headache symptomatology when taking the pill should consider alternate means of contraception.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8512048

Citation

Mattson, R H., and R W. Rebar. "Contraceptive Methods for Women With Neurologic Disorders." American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 168, no. 6 Pt 2, 1993, pp. 2027-32.
Mattson RH, Rebar RW. Contraceptive methods for women with neurologic disorders. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993;168(6 Pt 2):2027-32.
Mattson, R. H., & Rebar, R. W. (1993). Contraceptive methods for women with neurologic disorders. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 168(6 Pt 2), 2027-32.
Mattson RH, Rebar RW. Contraceptive Methods for Women With Neurologic Disorders. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993;168(6 Pt 2):2027-32. PubMed PMID: 8512048.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contraceptive methods for women with neurologic disorders. AU - Mattson,R H, AU - Rebar,R W, PY - 1993/6/1/pubmed PY - 1993/6/1/medline PY - 1993/6/1/entrez KW - Barrier Methods KW - Biology KW - Central Nervous System KW - Central Nervous System Effects KW - Cerebrovascular Effects KW - Congenital Abnormalities KW - Contraception KW - Contraception Failure KW - Contraceptive Methods KW - Contraceptive Usage KW - Diseases KW - Drugs--side effects KW - Enzymes KW - Enzymes And Enzyme Inhibitors KW - Family Planning KW - Headache KW - Ischemia KW - Literature Review KW - Neonatal Diseases And Abnormalities KW - Neurologic Effects KW - Oral Contraceptives KW - Physiology KW - Recommendations KW - Signs And Symptoms KW - Treatment KW - Vascular Diseases SP - 2027 EP - 32 JF - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology JO - Am J Obstet Gynecol VL - 168 IS - 6 Pt 2 N2 - Sex steroids in oral contraceptives exert several effects on the central nervous system and are therefore of concern when used by neurologically compromised women. In general, oral contraceptives do not aggravate epileptic seizures and are not contraindicated in cases of tension headache. Oral contraceptives can be used in cases of migraine without focal neurologic symptoms as long as headache symptoms do not worsen. Levels of sex steroids can be diminished through enzyme induction by antiepileptic drugs, giving rise to the possibility of contraceptive failure and exposure of the fetus to the teratogenic properties of antiseizure medications. Women with common migraine (without focal neurologic symptoms) who are taking oral contraceptives should be monitored for possible exacerbation of their symptoms. Women who do experience worsening of headache symptomatology when taking the pill should consider alternate means of contraception. SN - 0002-9378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8512048/Contraceptive_methods_for_women_with_neurologic_disorders_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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