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Lower levels of cigarette consumption found in smoke-free workplaces in California.
Arch Intern Med 1993; 153(12):1485-93AI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We examined the relationship between workplace smoking policies and smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption.

METHODS

California residents were questioned by telephone with the 1990 California Tobacco Survey. All respondents (11,704) above age 18 years who were employed indoors were used. Respondents were asked about smoking status, workplace smoking policy, desire to quit, and smoking history. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship of workplace smoking policy to smoking status, accounting for demographic variables.

RESULTS

Prevalence of regular smokers was significantly lower in smoke-free workplaces than in those with no restrictions (13.7% vs 20.6%, P < .001). Continuing regular smokers in smoke-free workplaces smoked fewer cigarettes than those in workplaces with no restrictions (296 vs 341 packs per year, P < .001). More comprehensive smoking policies were associated with smokers more likely to contemplate quitting (P = .014).

CONCLUSIONS

Employees in smoke-free workplaces have a lower smoking prevalence and, among continuing smokers, lower cigarette consumption than individuals working where smoking is permitted. We estimate cigarette consumption among employees indoors is 21% below that if there were no smoking restrictions in California workplaces. Furthermore, if all California workplaces were smoke-free, cigarette consumption among employees would be 41% below that if there were no workplace smoking restrictions, approximately a $406 million annual loss in sales to the tobacco industry. This study supports the hypothesis that smoke-free workplace policies are an effective public health measure for decreasing smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption among continuing smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Health Policy Studies, School of Medicine, San Francisco, Calif.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8512439

Citation

Woodruff, T J., et al. "Lower Levels of Cigarette Consumption Found in Smoke-free Workplaces in California." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 153, no. 12, 1993, pp. 1485-93.
Woodruff TJ, Rosbrook B, Pierce J, et al. Lower levels of cigarette consumption found in smoke-free workplaces in California. Arch Intern Med. 1993;153(12):1485-93.
Woodruff, T. J., Rosbrook, B., Pierce, J., & Glantz, S. A. (1993). Lower levels of cigarette consumption found in smoke-free workplaces in California. Archives of Internal Medicine, 153(12), pp. 1485-93.
Woodruff TJ, et al. Lower Levels of Cigarette Consumption Found in Smoke-free Workplaces in California. Arch Intern Med. 1993 Jun 28;153(12):1485-93. PubMed PMID: 8512439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lower levels of cigarette consumption found in smoke-free workplaces in California. AU - Woodruff,T J, AU - Rosbrook,B, AU - Pierce,J, AU - Glantz,S A, PY - 1993/6/28/pubmed PY - 1993/6/28/medline PY - 1993/6/28/entrez SP - 1485 EP - 93 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 153 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We examined the relationship between workplace smoking policies and smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption. METHODS: California residents were questioned by telephone with the 1990 California Tobacco Survey. All respondents (11,704) above age 18 years who were employed indoors were used. Respondents were asked about smoking status, workplace smoking policy, desire to quit, and smoking history. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship of workplace smoking policy to smoking status, accounting for demographic variables. RESULTS: Prevalence of regular smokers was significantly lower in smoke-free workplaces than in those with no restrictions (13.7% vs 20.6%, P < .001). Continuing regular smokers in smoke-free workplaces smoked fewer cigarettes than those in workplaces with no restrictions (296 vs 341 packs per year, P < .001). More comprehensive smoking policies were associated with smokers more likely to contemplate quitting (P = .014). CONCLUSIONS: Employees in smoke-free workplaces have a lower smoking prevalence and, among continuing smokers, lower cigarette consumption than individuals working where smoking is permitted. We estimate cigarette consumption among employees indoors is 21% below that if there were no smoking restrictions in California workplaces. Furthermore, if all California workplaces were smoke-free, cigarette consumption among employees would be 41% below that if there were no workplace smoking restrictions, approximately a $406 million annual loss in sales to the tobacco industry. This study supports the hypothesis that smoke-free workplace policies are an effective public health measure for decreasing smoking prevalence and cigarette consumption among continuing smokers. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8512439/Lower_levels_of_cigarette_consumption_found_in_smoke_free_workplaces_in_California_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/153/pg/1485 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -