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Defining and measuring the "right stuff": neuropsychiatrically enhanced flight screening (N-EFS).
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995 Oct; 66(10):951-6.AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

United States Air Force (USAF) commanders wish to make better pilot-selection and cockpit-assignment decisions. Also, some pilots will sustain head injuries that will affect their flying careers. The complex and unforgiving nature of aviation demands a conservative approach to occupational return after neurological insult. Therefore, a neuropsychological assessment is required to return to flying. The lack of pre-injury neuropsychological data, however, hinders accurate assessment of post-injury functioning.

HYPOTHESES

a) Psychological data may improve the pilot selection and assignment processes as military resources dwindle; and b) baseline intellectual/cognitive data may support the scientific basis of aeromedical decision-making.

METHODS

Neuropsychiatrically Enhanced Flight Screening (N-EFS) attempts to validate the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery (MAB), CogScreen, Revised NEO-PI (NEO-PI-R), and Personal Characteristics Inventory (PCI) for pilot selection and cockpit assignment. N-EFS also measures baseline intelligence (using the MAB) and cognitive functioning (using the CogScreen) for comparison purposes if a future medical flying waiver is needed after neurological insult. These assessments will compare the aviator's postinjury functioning to a personal intellectual functioning baseline captured at entry into aviation training.

RESULTS

N-EFS students are scoring from below average to very superior in intellectual assessment. Very preliminary personality testing results suggest few significant differences between male and female student pilots, with high extraversion being the most striking personality characteristic.

DISCUSSION

The wide range of intellectual functioning in pilot candidates argues for baseline data collection to improve future aeromedical decisions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Armstrong Laboratory (AFMC), Brooks AFB, TX, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

8526831

Citation

King, R E., and C F. Flynn. "Defining and Measuring the "right Stuff": Neuropsychiatrically Enhanced Flight Screening (N-EFS)." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 66, no. 10, 1995, pp. 951-6.
King RE, Flynn CF. Defining and measuring the "right stuff": neuropsychiatrically enhanced flight screening (N-EFS). Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995;66(10):951-6.
King, R. E., & Flynn, C. F. (1995). Defining and measuring the "right stuff": neuropsychiatrically enhanced flight screening (N-EFS). Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 66(10), 951-6.
King RE, Flynn CF. Defining and Measuring the "right Stuff": Neuropsychiatrically Enhanced Flight Screening (N-EFS). Aviat Space Environ Med. 1995;66(10):951-6. PubMed PMID: 8526831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Defining and measuring the "right stuff": neuropsychiatrically enhanced flight screening (N-EFS). AU - King,R E, AU - Flynn,C F, PY - 1995/10/1/pubmed PY - 1995/10/1/medline PY - 1995/10/1/entrez SP - 951 EP - 6 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 66 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: United States Air Force (USAF) commanders wish to make better pilot-selection and cockpit-assignment decisions. Also, some pilots will sustain head injuries that will affect their flying careers. The complex and unforgiving nature of aviation demands a conservative approach to occupational return after neurological insult. Therefore, a neuropsychological assessment is required to return to flying. The lack of pre-injury neuropsychological data, however, hinders accurate assessment of post-injury functioning. HYPOTHESES: a) Psychological data may improve the pilot selection and assignment processes as military resources dwindle; and b) baseline intellectual/cognitive data may support the scientific basis of aeromedical decision-making. METHODS: Neuropsychiatrically Enhanced Flight Screening (N-EFS) attempts to validate the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery (MAB), CogScreen, Revised NEO-PI (NEO-PI-R), and Personal Characteristics Inventory (PCI) for pilot selection and cockpit assignment. N-EFS also measures baseline intelligence (using the MAB) and cognitive functioning (using the CogScreen) for comparison purposes if a future medical flying waiver is needed after neurological insult. These assessments will compare the aviator's postinjury functioning to a personal intellectual functioning baseline captured at entry into aviation training. RESULTS: N-EFS students are scoring from below average to very superior in intellectual assessment. Very preliminary personality testing results suggest few significant differences between male and female student pilots, with high extraversion being the most striking personality characteristic. DISCUSSION: The wide range of intellectual functioning in pilot candidates argues for baseline data collection to improve future aeromedical decisions. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/8526831/Defining_and_measuring_the_"right_stuff":_neuropsychiatrically_enhanced_flight_screening__N_EFS__ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/veteransandmilitaryhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -